La boutique des nouvelles musiques

Review

Art Lange, Pulse!, 1 septembre 1998

In the 1950s, electronic composers began working with live instrumentalists, creating electroacoustic music and fulfilling the prophecy of the Futurists back before World War 1. Today, improvisers like the Québécois duo of guitarist Lussier and turntable-manipulator Tétreault have taken hold of the technology, slicing and splicing together the most outrageous sounds imaginable. Every piece constructs its own form from scratch, literally; their music is a collage of percussive clatter, radio static, distorted sounds from LPs, and abstract guitar timbres. The results have an almost tactile feel and unearthly ambiance— Nervure sounds like amplified steel-wool against the electroacoustic music and fulfilling the prophecy of the Futurists back before World War 1. Today, improvisers like the Québécois duo of guitarist Lussier and turntable-manipulator Tétreault have taken hold of the technology, slicing and splicing together the most outrageous sounds imaginable. Every piece constructs its own form from scratch, literally; their music is a collage of percussive clatter, radio static, distorted sounds from LPs, and abstract guitar timbres. The results have an almost tactile feel and unearthly ambiance— Nervure sounds like amplified steel-wool against the surface of a vinyl disc, and Azur could be the soundtrack to John Fahey’s nightmare. Don’t listen for conventional melody or regular rhythms; the music is in the confusion of sounds and sources. ****

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.