La boutique des nouvelles musiques

Artistes David Ryshpan

David Ryshpan

  • Journaliste

Articles écrits

FIJM 2010: Day 2

David Ryshpan, Settled In Shipping, 27 juin 2010

Jean Derome, founding figure of Montréal’s musique actuelle scene, took the stage of L’Astral. Playing music from his last album To Continue with his regular group les Dangereux Zhoms, comprised of longtime cohorts Tom Walsh on trombone, Guillaume Dostaler on piano, Pierre Cartier on electric bass and Pierre Tanguay on drums.

Derome, in deadpan delivery, described the tunes as a suite dedicated to the mundane incidents of life on the road, with titles like Nez qui coule and Cogné de genou.

Dostaler is a very deliberate player in every comping phrase and every line. It took a while before Tanguay unleashed his irreverence in the solo of Prières. Cartier sang La grenouille et le boeuf admirably in a trembling baritone and his electric bass allowed for a sustained, almost post-rock undertone to Nez qui coule. Walsh often relied on glissandi and extreme high register, often complemented by a plunger. Derome, on alto and soprano saxophones and flute, played with a fairly clean tone, marked by intentional spurts of overblowing and other extended techniques.

Compositionally, the pieces featured some intriguing structures — the Berg-like stacked tone row of La grenouille, the intervallic unisons of Nez qui coule. The blend between Walsh’s trombone and Derome’s alto was especially notable. The centrepiece of the set was Prières (based on Protestant hymns), with the horns in harmonized chorale, the cued repeated figures for Tanguay’s solo, and splitting the band into two time feels. Throughout the show, it was all very interesting but the spark was lacking — perhaps that was part of the tribute to the mundane as well.

Compositionally, the pieces featured some intriguing structures — the Berg-like stacked tone row of La grenouille, the intervallic unisons of Nez qui coule.

Barnyard Drama (Suoni / L’Off Festival)

David Ryshpan, Panpot, 3 juillet 2008

… The evening started off with Philippe Lauzier and Pierre-Yves Martel of Quartetski, turntablist Martin Tétreault and Norwegian guitarist Kim Myhr in three quiet and textural improvisations. The set started with Lauzier playing his alto saxophone with a plunger mute affixed on his bell, creating a muffled and distant sound. The blend of Tétreault’s turntables, Myhr’s guitar effects and Martel’s viola da gamba was impressive. It was difficult to determine where the sounds were coming from. Martel, unamplified, would bow furiously, unleashing streams of harmonics, and even thump his bow against the body of the instrument. Myhr and Lauzier used their instruments more as resonators for external objects and vocalizations. Myhr many times moved a spinning toy across the body of his classical guitar, which he alternately played lying flat on his lap or in normal playing position. Lauzier also played bass clarinet, emphasizing the overtones of the instrument, and pulled out a plastic tube through which he circular breathed. At that moment, with Lauzier playing the tube, the whole group combined to sound like a massive vacuum cleaner, or that noisy radiator from down the hall — a sound full of airy noise, feedback and harmonics…

The blend of Tétreault’s turntables, Myhr’s guitar effects and Martel’s viola da gamba was impressive.

Barnyard Drama (Suoni / L’Off Fest.)

David Ryshpan, Panpot, 3 juillet 2008

… A third Quartetski member, Gordon Allen, followed with his new trio, All Up In There, featuring percussionist Michel F Côté and theremin player Frank Martel. Allen started with a very breathy, noisy sound, leaving lots of space in his line. Côté began with a towel draped over his kit, and even without it he retained a very dry sound, with small crisp cymbals. Martel successfully avoided the sci-fi connotations of the theremin, adding a unique colour to the set, manipulating it to truly engage with Allen. Côté had two condenser mics that he ran through two Pignose amps. When he used them as sticks to amplify his kit, he gave the drums a fuzzy, grungy sound that would not have been out of place on a Tom Waits record. At other times he pointed the mics at each other or at the amps, manipulating the pitch and volume of the feedback almost like a second theremin. In the more aggressive moments, Côté played a somewhat tribal rock beat while Allen elicited noise and feedback sounds out of his trumpet and Martel anchored everything with a deep, ominous theremin bassline. The physical gestures Côté and Martel used to improvise were nearly as important as the sound itself…

Barnyard Drama (Suoni / L’Off Fest.)

David Ryshpan, Panpot, 3 juillet 2008

… The final set was courtesy of Toronto’s Barnyard Drama with guest Montréaler Bernard Falaise on guitar. Their set commenced very quietly, with minimal electronica courtesy of drummer Jean Martin. Christine Duncan’s distant vocalizations were nearly inaudible at the beginning, but over the course of the set she displayed her wide range and her control of various techniques — guttural groans, mouth noises, Janis Joplin-esque yelps and screams, hints of Inuit throat-singing, pseudo-beatboxing and pure bel canto soprano. She exhibited a stunning sense of control, never seeming to strain herself and switching between techniques very quickly. Guitarist Justin Haynes was a perfect foil to Falaise, both of them getting fuzzy at times but retaining a bit of atmosphere around their sound. Haynes would sometimes bow his guitar, as did Kim Myhr in the first set but with an altogether different sound — where Myhr was bowing the body of his acoustic guitar, Haynes bowed the strings of his electric. At other moments, Haynes conjured a rubbery tone somewhere in between a guitar and Frank Martel’s theremin. Falaise was seemingly everywhere at once, manipulating his arsenal of pedals with expertise and complementing Haynes’ guitar. Martin was processing both his kit and Duncan’s voice, and anchoring his open playing with hints of breakbeats and a deconstructed take on John Bonham’s rock bombast. The set ended on a gradual descrescendo, melting away into a quiet rendition of Little Girl Blue.

Blogue

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.