actuellecd

Track listing detail

String Quartet No. 4

Michael Oesterle

  • Year of composition: 2019
  • Duration: 26:21
  • Instrumentation: string quartet
  • Commission: Quatuor Bozzini, Earle Brown Music Foundation Charitable Trust

Stereo

ISRC CAA4J2210014

  • 96 kHz, 24 bits

Actually, this piece is not the fourth string quartet I have written, and I don’t usually use generic titles for my pieces — but I have wanted to write a String Quartet No. 4 for some time. The idea dates back to when I was younger and impressionable. I heard several premieres of String Quartet No. 4’s which imprinted a sense of significance for that title on me. How wonderful it must be to have written a quartet of string quartets! (Sorry Robert Schumann). In this piece, as in all of my music, I am interested in balancing musical materials that are geometric, expressive, and puritanical. I am grateful to Quatuor Bozzini and the Earle Brown Music Foundation Charitable Trust who co-commissioned this piece.

[vi-21]

Premiere

  • July 30, 2019, Evolution of the Quartet Faculty Concert, Rolston Recital Hall — The Banff Centre for the Arts, Banff (Alberta, Canada)

Performers

Daydream Mechanics

Michael Oesterle

  • Year of composition: 2001
  • Duration: 12:18
  • Instrumentation: string quartet
  • Commission: Quatuor Bozzini

Stereo

ISRC CAA4J2210015

  • 96 kHz, 24 bits

The phrase “Daydream Mechanics” is taken from the title of a book by French-Canadian poet and novelist, Nicole Brossard. This quartet recalls the awkward adventures of childhood when the backyard seemed as full of fearsome possibilities as any unexplored geography. The simple mechanics of controlling ones own maneuvers make a challenge of a cultivated wilderness.

[xi-21]


Daydream Mechanics was titled Daydream Mechanics V through 2020.

Premiere

  • April 29, 2001, Concert, Schwartzsche Villa, Berlin (Germany)

Performers

Three Pieces for String Quartet

Michael Oesterle

  • Year of composition: 2016

Stereo

The three short pieces all use modules within a scheme of a triangular number sequences (1, 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2-3-4…). Each piece is a playful puzzle, the music wallows in the process itself, in the patterns of a system, a method, searching for discovery. The musical motivation is the joy of moving forward, and finding a path back to the beginning. The title is an homage to Stravinsky’s Three Pieces for String Quartet, but had this piece been in four parts, the title would have changed to be an homage to John Cage.

String Quartet No. 3 “Alan Turing”

Michael Oesterle

  • Year of composition: 2010
  • Instrumentation: string quartet
  • Commission: Quatuor Bozzini, Société Radio-Canada (SRC)

Stereo

ISRC CAA4J2210020


Many of my works are about my fascination with the lives of scientists. In these compositions I don’t attempt to give a precise outline or demonstration of any specific scientific theorem, they are simply the result of having been inspired by the force of concentration and creativity of scientists, their method of work and the frequency with which they meet society’s opposition. This string quartet was my first in a series of pieces about the British mathematician Alan Turing.

Alan Turing took a second hand violin and a sextant to Princeton University: the violin, to be like Einstein, the sextant to chart his course while aboard the ship that carried him there. He never learned to play the violin well, (his brother referred to his playing as “excruciating”) but he loved to play and played for those he loved. He played for his lover and later, for the officers who arrested him. He played as a declaration of faith in civilisation and the need to strive towards greatness of both heart and mind.

String Quartet No. 3 “Alan Turing” was titled Alan Turing — Solace for Irreversible Losses (Matter and Spirit; Delilah; The Universal Machine Concept; Acronyms; Morphogenesis; Hyperboloids of Wondrous Light) through 2020.

Premiere

  • April 20, 2010, Under the title Alan Turing — Solace for Irreversible Losses: Salon des compositeurs 2010, Homage Series Gilles Tremblay: I, Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur, Montréal (Québec)

Performers