The New & Avant-garde Music Store

Review

François Couture, AllMusic, May 6, 1997

Michel F Côté, Quebec’s most eclectic percussionist, had decided to put his Bruire ensemble on hold after three records on Ambiances Magnétiques to form a new band. This time, he proposed a trio with Bernard Falaise (Miriodor, Les Projectionnistes) on guitar and Alexandre St-Onge on bass. Klaxon Gueule (something like “Yelling Horn”) was at first a talkative trio - after all, it is the title of their album (Bavards). The first disc of this short 2-CD set contains twelve improvisations titled humorously (Aptitude algébrique innée equals “Innate Algebraic Aptitude,” Friandise cannibale equals “Cannibal Candy”). To the nervous drums of Côté and the busy bass of St-Onge, Falaise adds noisy textures with sharp angles, creating an electric, noisy free jazz. The second CD showcases Klaxon Gueule with saxophonist Christopher Cauley on six quartet improvs. Here, the music is more in the orthodox free improvisation realm. The contagious energy of the musicians make Bavards a real treat. This was recorded at a time when St-Onge still approached the bass in a conventional way and the trio played jazz-anchored improv. The situation would change drastically with their second CD, eloquently titled Muets (“Silent”), an exploration of textural string-scratching, feedback-controlling free improv.

The contagious energy of the musicians make Bavards a real treat.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.