The New & Avant-garde Music Store

24 Frames — Trance Tim Brady, Martin Messier

This item is also included in the 24 Frames — Scatter + Trance box set (AM 905).

… immense, assured and accomplished work The WholeNote, Canada

Massive booming, enigmatic suspensions, evocative plateaus where the possibilities of a treated source are multiplied until the starting sound grows into a monster capable of killing, but also striking points of marvelous resonance, stunning us for a few seconds. The Squid’s Ear, USA

“electric guitarist Tim Brady… (an) exuberant one-man ensemble…” — The New York Times

24 Frames — Trance is composer and guitarist Tim Brady’s 16th CD, and the second to include a companion DVD, a document of his continuing multi-media collaboration with video artist Martin Messier.

24 Frames — Trance is a music of hypnotic states, of altered guitars, of 6-string alchemy, of virtuoso performances and compositional subtleties.

24 Frames — Trance is the first release of a planned series of 3 CD+DVD releases, creating a large-scale work for solo guitar and other media, with almost 3 hours of new music by one of the most influential composer/guitarists working today.

Trance — driving rhythms and a stunning solo melodic improvisation, over an orchestra of up to 35 electric guitars

Sul A — an intense and mysterious soundscape, focussing on the sound of a single string (A string) to build its dramatic structure

Switch — 5 short movments, each exploring a different approach to solo guitar and electronics

O is for Ostinato — relentless arpeggios combined with simple electronics create an Escher-like swirl of harmony, pulse and timbre.

Invisible Quartet — music in slow motion, music of the spheres, based on a radical re-working of a single sample of a glissando by a string quartet in dialogue with heavily processed electric guitar textures.

57 Ways of Playing Guitar — the largest work on the CD, in 4 sections, moving from simple solo guitar triads to complex electroacoustic invention to jazz/rock inspired melodic mayhem.

CD-Audio + 1 DVD-Video

24 Frames — Trance

Tim Brady, Martin Messier

Some recommended items

In the press

  • Andrew Timar, The WholeNote, no. 17:6, March 1, 2012
    … immense, assured and accomplished work
  • Massimo Ricci, The Squid’s Ear, March 25, 2011
    Massive booming, enigmatic suspensions, evocative plateaus where the possibilities of a treated source are multiplied until the starting sound grows into a monster capable of killing, but also striking points of marvelous resonance, stunning us for a few seconds.
  • Gilles Boisclair, SOCAN, Paroles & Musique, no. 18:1, March 1, 2011
    Tim Brady sait encore une fois nous captiver.
  • Lawrence Joseph, Montreal Mirror, February 24, 2011
    Brady is a master technician
  • Michael Ross, Guitar Player, January 1, 2011
    Canadian guitarist and composer Tim Brady has been doing his best to increase the electric guitar’s presence in classical music since 1988.
  • James Hale, Signal to Noise, no. 60, December 1, 2010
    57 Ways of Playing Guitar sounds like a summary statement.
  • François Couture, Monsieur Délire, October 13, 2010
    This record puts him (once again) on par with Fred Frith and Nick Didkovsky.

Review

Andrew Timar, The WholeNote, no. 17:6, March 1, 2012
… immense, assured and accomplished work

Heard In

Massimo Ricci, The Squid’s Ear, March 25, 2011

In a recent Guitar Player feature, Tim Brady jokes about the fact that Brahms never wrote stuff for electric guitar, ironically justifying a relentless quest for the instrument’s potential residency in the empire of commonly accepted “serious” music. This double set — part of an ongoing series — is an intriguing proposition in that sense. On a compact disc lie six of the twenty-four Frames; on the DVD the same compositions (“for electric guitar, electronics, samples, multitrack technology and video”) are accompanied by Martin Messier’s experimental imagery, which comprise computerized abstraction and disfigurement of relatively normal films, such as a woman walking with difficulty in a snowy town.

Brady recorded all the parts himself, a herculean task that — in his words — sometimes requires years just to find the right tone for a short cut. Unluckily, the artistic consequence of this sort of agony is only partially agreeable. Chilly linear materials and pitilessly pitch-transposed counterpoints summon up a combination of frozen heaven and dissonant hell, ultimately negating a definite position to the work. Think of a motorized King Crimson zombie to have an idea of the totally bloodless interlocking of different lines, sporadically escorted by peripheral undercurrents. Angular arpeggios, overdriven alien themes, plucked clusters and the obsessive repetitiveness generated by dozens of superimposed axes are perceived as rather conventional anomalies that don’t enlarge our database for this field, resulting interesting in spurts — and utterly unemotional.

Where the Canadian really excels is in the creation of atmospheric sonorities and breathtaking milieus. Massive booming, enigmatic suspensions, evocative plateaus where the possibilities of a treated source are multiplied until the starting sound grows into a monster capable of killing, but also striking points of marvelous resonance, stunning us for a few seconds. Too bad that those dreams are often broken by the recurrence of a cerebral kind of assault that situates the record in the infinite archive of “over-average-yet-unmemorable” releases, in total disproportion to the incontestable compositional effort.

Massive booming, enigmatic suspensions, evocative plateaus where the possibilities of a treated source are multiplied until the starting sound grows into a monster capable of killing, but also striking points of marvelous resonance, stunning us for a few seconds.

Music Reviews

Lawrence Joseph, Montreal Mirror, February 24, 2011

It’s oddly fascinating to hear distorted, Van Halen-like guitar riffs deconstructed into tightly wound electroacoustic compositions. Lacking drums and bass, and trading the grit of rock clubs for the pristine studio, an atmosphere of reverberated coldness pervades this CD/DVD set. Brady is a master technician, creating endless textural variety from layered guitars with time-warping effects, whipping up shimmering walls of electric teardrops. The CD’s tracks reappear on the DVD, accompanied by Messier’s swirling, jittery videos—mostly abstract, but includ­ing some manipulated film loops of Montréal scenes, a perfect complement to the music. 8/10

Brady is a master technician

Review

Michael Ross, Guitar Player, January 1, 2011
Canadian guitarist and composer Tim Brady has been doing his best to increase the electric guitar’s presence in classical music since 1988.

Review

James Hale, Signal to Noise, no. 60, December 1, 2010
57 Ways of Playing Guitar sounds like a summary statement.

Listening Diary

François Couture, Monsieur Délire, October 13, 2010

24 Frames is a series of 24 pieces for guitar written over the past few years. 24 Frames: Trance is the first installment in a triptych documenting the whole cycle. This first release is actually part three, featuring the compositions Frame 19 up to Frame 24, all for electric guitar, electronics, and video (by Martin Messier) — hence the CD+DVD format. Messier’s videos are interesting abstract works, though not essential to the music (except perhaps for Frame 24: 57 Ways of Playing Guitar). Brady delivers virtuoso performances and deploys treasures of original techniques. This record puts him (once again) on par with Fred Frith and Nick Didkovsky. 24 Frames: 57 Ways of Playing Guitar in particular makes him worthy of the title of guitar hero. A splendid record that goes straight to the essence of Brady’s aesthetics. I’m eagerly awaiting the other two installments.

This record puts him (once again) on par with Fred Frith and Nick Didkovsky.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.