The New & Avant-garde Music Store
DAME’s Annual Happy Holidays Sale! — Up to 50% off on 142 records Until January 7th, 2020 — Click to see

Étymologie Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay

a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue. Signal to Noise, USA

… they show their deep affinity with the material. They stay close to the original pieces, but not in a nostalgic way. Vital, Netherlands

Recorded at the historic Lion d’Or in front of a full house on June 29, 2006, this performance is a living embodiment of the ongoing musical conversation among three great friends—and great artists. Their playing is imbued with the essential spirit of jazz modernism, featuring group interplay of the highest order. — Mike Chamberlain, April 2007

DVD-Video [NTSC, multi-region]: Surround 5.1 (Dolby Digital) + Stereo 2.0 (Dolby Digital) • English subtitles

Étymologie

Live • L’Off Festival de Jazz de Montréal 2006

Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay

Jean Derome, Normand Guilbeault, Pierre Tanguay

Notices

Étymologie

The first time I saw Jean Derome, Normand Guilbeault and Pierre Tanguay was in March 1997. On that occasion, the three were playing-along with trombonist Tom Walsh and pianist Guillaume Dostaler — in Réunion, a group under Tanguay’s leadership. The quintet played compositions by Duke Ellington, Ben Webster and Harry “Sweets” Edison. I was immediately captivated by their formidable sense of swing and the manner in which each was attuned to the subtle variations that the others played.

Fast forward several years, past wonderful performances by bassist Guilbeault’s Mingus Project and the Monk repertory trio Évidence, with Derome, Tanguay, and bassist Pierre Cartier, to the Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay. On their first album, 10 compositions, recorded in 2003, and in performances at the time, the Trio reworked Derome compositions dating back, in some cases, almost 30 years, in what might be loosely termed an advanced hard-bop fashion.

Subsequently, the Trio has returned, for the most part, to its activities as a repertory ensemble. Their second album, The Feeling of Jazz, includes material from the whole spectrum of jazz history. Compositions by Eric Dolphy, Misha Mengelberg, Lennie Tristano, and Charles Mingus are featured in their live sets, along with pieces written by Derome. But these mature artists are not content to re-create the originals. They have too much respect for the spirit, and yes, the feeling, of jazz to do that. Each performance of the Trio is an episode in their continuing dialogue with one another and the music. As with Réunion, and through the work with their other jazz-oriented groups, their playing is imbued with the essential spirit of jazz modernism, featuring group interplay of the highest order.

Étymologie (titled, appropriately, from a Derome composition written as an homage to Ornette Coleman) is a DVD-Video recording of their set at the 2006 edition of L’Off Festival de Jazz de Montréal. In it, we can see clearly the gentle, warm wit of the musicians and their mutual musical empathy. Recorded at the historic Lion d’Or in front of a full house on June 29, 2006 (coincidentally, Derome’s 51st birthday), this performance is a living embodiment of the ongoing musical conversation among three great friends — and great artists.

Mike Chamberlain, Montréal [iv-07]

Some recommended items

In the press

  • Kurt Gottschalk, Signal to Noise, no. 48, December 21, 2007
    a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue.
  • Henryk Palczewski, Informator “Ars” 2, no. 47, December 1, 2007
  • Dolf Mulder, Vital, no. 603, November 26, 2007
    … they show their deep affinity with the material. They stay close to the original pieces, but not in a nostalgic way.
  • Bill Shoemaker, Point of Departure, no. 14, November 1, 2007
    … it is the trio’s Marxist chemistry (that would be Groucho, not Karl) that keeps the viewer glued to the screen.
  • Vincenzo Giorgio, Wonderous Stories, November 1, 2007
    Infatti, buona parte dell’energia profusa in quel giugno canadese rimane felicemente impressa nell’ora abbondante che questa nuova uscita dell’Ambiances Magnetiques ci regala.
  • Réjean Beaucage, Voir, September 6, 2007
    Il faut voir la facilité déconcertante avec laquelle ce Dangereux Zhom souffle les passages les plus ardus à la flûte ou aux sax (…)
  • Glen Hall, Exclaim!, September 1, 2007
    The performances are uniformly strong…
  • Marc Chénard, La Scena Musicale, no. 13:1, September 1, 2007
    On ne peut qu’apprécier la ferveur de cette prestation…
  • SP, Ici Montréal, July 19, 2007
    Pour ceux qui ne les ont jamais vus, voici l’occasion d’être soufflé par leur intensité
  • Len Dobbin, Montreal Mirror, no. 23:3, July 5, 2007
  • Serge Truffaut, Le Devoir, June 30, 2007
    … un immense groupe du monde mondial. Point barre.

CD/DVD/LP/MP3

Kurt Gottschalk, Signal to Noise, no. 48, December 21, 2007

Lately some members of Montréal’s endlessly inventive Ambiances Magnétiques collective have been turning to songbooks south of their border. Last year saw a tribute to Charles Mingus by bassist Normand Guilbeault and clarinetist Robert Marcel Lepage’s excellent Pee Wee Russell album, as well as the second CD by the Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay, which included pieces by Sonny Clark, Duke Ellington, Lee Konitz and Cole Porter. The latter’s new release is a live DVD that captures a strong set featuring compositions by Ellington, Eric Dolphy, Lennie Tristano and Fats Waller, as well as a piece by pianist Misha Mengelberg, who certainly deserves to be in such company. Derome himself is no stranger to jazz standards — his longstanding Évidence trio (with Tanguay and bassist Pierre Cartier, who’s proven to be something of a crooner as well in the last couple years) is built from the Thelonious Monk repertoire. The new trio started out performing original compositions (and two Derome pieces are included here), but it’s more than welcome to hear a band this strong taking on the classics. And if their The Feeling of Jazz lacked a little oomph, in front of an audience they are solid and graceful, and the set list is well-chosen. Derome takes on Ellington’s Fleurette Africaine and Waller’s Jitterbug Waltz (hands down two of the loveliest melodies of their era) on flute, and plays a confident saxophone on Dolphy’s Miss Ann and 245 (another nice choice) and Guilbeault is lyrical (if a bit under-miked) throughout. But the main reason to watch (as opposed to simply listening) this set is Tanguay. Like New York’s Tom Rainey, he is subtle yet always pushing; his finesse is easy to miss on record, but watching him just affirms how on his toes he always is. The video is well-shot, with multiple cameras, soft white lighting and very good sound, a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue.

a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue.

Review

Dolf Mulder, Vital, no. 603, November 26, 2007

This trio is around for more then a decade now, and two CDs preceded this dvd. The first dvd-release by Ambiances Mangétiques if I’m not mistaken. The three musicians need no further introduction. All three of them are veterans of the Montréal jazz and impro scene. Most of the time they play their own work or any other modern music. But from time to time all three of them show their love for the tradition of jazz. Guilbeault did a project on Charles Mingus. With his quintet Réunion Tanguay played work from Duke Ellington and Ben Webster. And also in this trio-format they concentrate on the history of jazz, although on their first CD 10 compositions, they did only pieces by Derome that he composed during different stages of his career. On this dvd they play compositions by Eric Dolphy, Duke Ellington, Lennie Tristano, Misha Mengelberg, a.o. Plus 2 compositions by Derome. One of them is Etymologie, a piece dedicated to and composed in the style of Ornette Coleman. Tanguay plays drums, Guilbeault doublebass and Derome plays saxes, flute and voice. In their interpretations they show their deep affinity with the material. They stay close to the original pieces, but not in a nostalgic way. In their reworking labour they try to proof the relevance and beauty if these pieces for the present time. From what I read, they are successful in reaching a younger public and younger jazz musicians. I don’t know why they chose the dvd-format for this particular release. But it opens the opportunity not only to hear but also to see the interplay between these three gifted musicians during a concert at the L’Off Festival de Jazz de Montréal in 2006.

… they show their deep affinity with the material. They stay close to the original pieces, but not in a nostalgic way.

Page One

Bill Shoemaker, Point of Departure, no. 14, November 1, 2007

[…] Even when musicians have even an iota of Ahmed’s magnetism they can be persuasive on DVD because of their wit and pluck, Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay’s straight-up concert film, Étymologie (Ambiances Magnétiques), and eyenoises… the paris movie, director Süsanna Schonberg 1994 doc about Tim Berne’s Bloodcount (released with 2 CDs in the Screwgun collection, Seconds), are cases in point. The fact that the Québécois trio simply burns through a program predominated by chestnuts by Dolphy, Waller and others notwithstanding, it is the trio’s Marxist chemistry (that would be Groucho, not Karl) that keeps the viewer glued to the screen. Saxophonist/flutist Jean Derome, grins as if he’s about to spring a well-planned jape; drummer Pierre Tanguay, exudes mirth even when he’s burning down the house; and bassist Normand Guilbeault is the straight man essential to the set-up. […]

… it is the trio’s Marxist chemistry (that would be Groucho, not Karl) that keeps the viewer glued to the screen.

Recensione

Vincenzo Giorgio, Wonderous Stories, November 1, 2007

C’è chi dice che il dvd tolga qualcosa alla magia dell’ascolto. Forse può essere vero in alcuni casi ma non per questa documentazione video del concerto tenuto dal trio francofono Jean Derome, (sassofoni, flauto, voce), Normand Guibeault (contrabbasso) e Pierre Tanguay (percussioni) il 29 giugno 2006 al Festival del Jazz di Montréal che risulta essere particolarmente preziosa e coinvolgente. Infatti, buona parte dell’energia profusa in quel giugno canadese rimane felicemente impressa nell’ora abbondante che questa nuova uscita dell’Ambiances Magnetiques ci regala. Innanzitutto è molto suggestivo assaporare il modo con cui questo combo “borderline” si confronta con alcuni classici (più o meno recenti) della storia del jazz: come la selvaggia essenzialità dell’approccio a due “mitiche” composizioni di Eric Dolphy: Miss Ann e 245, mentre è il drumming scrosciante di Tanguay ad introdurre il più classico degli autori classici: Duke Ellington con la sua Fleurette Africaine ovvero il blues africaneggiante del Duca passato con lo “scanner destrutturate” dei Nostri attraverso un inedito tappeto percussivo argutamente rinforzato dai densi panneggi contrabbassistici di Guibeault ed il flauto stralunato di un Derome semplicemente strepitoso! Non da meno la riproposizione della sommessa contabilità di A Bit Nervous del grande pianista olandese Misha Mengelberg tutta giocata sulla felpata sezione ritmica e il baritono di Jean che non smette di stupirci con la sua performance vocal-recitativa-flautistica di Jitterbug Waltz di Fats Waller. Poi è il bebop più rassicurante del dittico My Melancholy Baby (dove c’è lo zampino del grande Lennie Tristano) mentre viene lasciato uno spazio piuttosto marginale alle composizioni originali del gruppo: solo due ed entrambe firmate dallo stesso Derome: la spumeggiante Étymologie (manifesto tributo a Ornette Coleman) e la conclusiva Fluide che combina elementi più free a spasmi dal vago sapore bandistico. Ottimo strumento per chiunque voglia ricostruire l’etimologia del Derome & Co!

Infatti, buona parte dell’energia profusa in quel giugno canadese rimane felicemente impressa nell’ora abbondante che questa nuova uscita dell’Ambiances Magnetiques ci regala.

Disques de la semaine

Réjean Beaucage, Voir, September 6, 2007

Première sortie d’un DVD (stéréo et 5.1) chez Ambiances Magnétiques, La Mecque de la musique actuelle d’ici, mais dans la série «jazz». Quel jazz? Le meilleur: celui d’Eric Dolphy et de Duke Ellington, de Misha Mengelberg ou de Fats Waller (ces deux dernières pièces déjà entendues sur le précédent CD du trio, The Feeling of Jazz). On a aussi deux titres de Jean Derome. Il faut voir la facilité déconcertante avec laquelle ce Dangereux Zhom souffle les passages les plus ardus à la flûte ou aux sax, et apprécier le soutien actif de ses collègues, Pierre Tanguay à la batterie et Normand Guilbeault à la contrebasse. Concert enregistré en juin 2006 au Off Festival de Jazz. Le début d’une tradition, souhaitons-le. (4/5)

Il faut voir la facilité déconcertante avec laquelle ce Dangereux Zhom souffle les passages les plus ardus à la flûte ou aux sax (…)

Music DVD Reviews

Glen Hall, Exclaim!, September 1, 2007

Veteran collaborators Jean Derome (reedist), Normand Guilbeault (bassist) and drummer Pierre Tanguay have spent years evolving into a musical “organism,” an organic melding of the identities of the individuals into a seamless, distilled creative entity. And this DVD of their live performance at L’Off Festival de Jazz de Montréal captures them in situ in that most naturalistic jazz setting: the crowded club. The repertoire is drawn from compositions the group have long been exploring and the results show a deep understanding of the material. The performances are uniformly strong, with Derome’s alto, flute and baritone leading the way, displaying a formidable technical fluency, a deep emotional core and a profound respect for his musical forebears Eric Dolphy and Anthony Braxton. Some highlights include Guilbeault’s stunning arco solo in 245, Tanguay’s compellingly melodic Ed Blackwell-like stick work and Derome’s affecting flute playing on Fleurette Africaine and raucous alto on Miss Ann. Two problems with the disc: Derome’s remarks are mixed too low and the hyperactive editing is annoyingly distracting in spots. Besides that, this DVD is the next best thing to seeing the group live.

The performances are uniformly strong…

Échos d’été

Marc Chénard, La Scena Musicale, no. 13:1, September 1, 2007

On connaît bien ces trois lascars, tous de bons (on ne dira pas encore «vieux») routiers de la scène jazz et musique actuelle de chez nous. Comptant deux disques à leur crédit (Dix Compositions et The Feeling of Jazz), ils reviennent à la charge avec une préstation de concert, reproduite presque intégralement. On y retrouve, entre autres, des reprises de leurs disques (Jitterbug Waltz, Fleurette Africaine d’Ellington, la pièce titre Étymologie et Fluide, tous deux de Derome), deux pièces d’Eric Dolphy et une de Tristano. Réalisée en 2006 au Off Festival de Jazz, cette captation nous en met plein les oreilles… et les yeux. Côté sonore, on peut accorder bien des dièses à cette production, même dans les morceaux avec plusieurs bémols à la clef. M. Derome proclama jadis qu’il refusait de jouer la musique de gens qu’il ne pouvait pas joindre au téléphone. Cela exclurait pratiquement tous les morceaux de ce disque de 68 minutes, la seule exception étant A Bit Nervous du pianiste batave Misha Mengelberg. Mais qui ne finit pas par changer son fusil d’épaule avec le temps? Côté visuel, on nous autorisera une ou deux réserves: les prises de caméra multiples qui deviennent étourdissantes à la longue, surtout quand elles changent aux cinq secondes (ou moins). Le jeu nerveux de Derome (surtout à l’alto) est déjà vertigineux, faut-il l’amplifier davantage par un tel montage? Et que dire de ces prises de vue du bassiste Guilbeault, isolé à droite ou à gauche de l’écran, devant un arrière-plan noir comme la nuit? De plus, on voit le trio entier au milieu de la salle, mais l’éclairage sombre détone avec les plans rapprochés, nettement mieux éclairés. Certes, ce n’est pas une mince affaire que de synchroniser son et image dans ce genre de montage et, sur ce plan, le coup est bien réussi. En terminant, retenons qu’il s’agit d’une production musicale d’abord, et cinématographique ensuite. On ne peut qu’apprécier la ferveur de cette prestation, quitte à se ferner les yeux de temps en temps pour mieux se laisser transporter par les gaillardises des musiciens. Quatre étoiles pour le son, trois pour l’image.

On ne peut qu’apprécier la ferveur de cette prestation…

DVD

SP, Ici Montréal, July 19, 2007

Avec seulement 2 albums en 12 ans, c’est en concert que ce trio d’excellents musiciens déploie sa redoutable efficacité. Pour ceux qui ne les ont jamais vus, voici l’occasion d’être soufflé par leur intensité: pas de réchauffement ici, tout est à fond dès la première pièce. Enregistré au Lion d’Or pendant l’Off Festival de Jazz 2006, la prise de son est très bonne (disponible en 5.1) et les images de qualité. Ces géants du jazz d’ici n’hésitent pas à revisiter les Dolphy, Ellington, Tristano, Waller, Mengelberg et, bien sûr, Derome de façon très convaincante. Leurs sourires sur la pochette démontrent leur satisfaction autant que la nôtre.

Pour ceux qui ne les ont jamais vus, voici l’occasion d’être soufflé par leur intensité

Mini CD Reviews

Len Dobbin, Montreal Mirror, no. 23:3, July 5, 2007

A DVD of one of the city’s finest trios shot live at last year’s Off Festival, doing material by Dolphy, Mengelberg, Tristano, Ellington, Waller and Derome. (9.5 / 10)

Jazz: Le DGT, le très grand groupe

Serge Truffaut, Le Devoir, June 30, 2007

On ne le dira jamais assez… Non! C’est pas ça. On n’insistera jamais assez: le trio formé de Pierre Tanguay, Normand Guilbeault et Jean Derome est un grand groupe. Pas un grand trio ou quartet moins un, un très grand groupe. Pas un grand groupe montréalais, québécois, canadien ou nord-américain, mais bien un immense groupe du monde mondial. Point barre.

Cette semaine, dans le cadre du Off Festival de jazz de Montréal, le Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay a publié un DVD enregistré lors de l’édition antérieure de cet événement. C’est un bijou, un régal, si on aime le jazz évidemment. Plus précisément si on aime le jazz qui décape au quart de tour parce que décliné sur le mode de la passion. De la passion et de l’intégrité. On s’explique.

Tout d’abord, il faut évoquer le programme du spectacle. Il faut le souligner parce qu’il met en relief l’extraordinaire habileté du groupe à détailler, et non pas relire, les moindres beautés du jazz. Qu’on y songe: en guise d’introduction ils nous servent Miss Ann d’Eric Dolphy. Puis ils enchaînent avec 245 du même immense Dolphy, le saxophoniste qui adorait les pinsons. Et c’est pas une blague.

Ensuite? Fleurette africaine de Duke Ellington, Étymologie de Jean Derome, A Bit Nervous de Misha Mengelberg, Jitterbug Waltz de Richard Malby, Baby de Lennie Tristano et Fluide de Derome. Bref, un programme de rêve, sauf qu’on aurait adoré qu’il glisse entre deux morceaux une pièce de Roland Kirk, que les musiciens décomposent à souhait.

Leur jeu? Ils est à hauteur d’homme. Et comme ils sont longs… Concrètement, empiriquement, comme au ras des pâquerettes, leur jeu a ceci de bien comme de bon que les trois musiciens ne font pas de la gestion de risque mais qu’ils le cultivent, le risque. Résultat: ils ne captent pas, ils kidnappent plutôt notre attention. Et ça, c’est du grand art. Intitulé Étymologie, ce DVD a paru sur étiquette Ambiances Magnétiques.

… un immense groupe du monde mondial. Point barre.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.