Blogue ›› Archives ›› Par date ›› 2007 ›› Décembre

27 décembre 2007
Par Dolf Mulder in Vital #607 (Pays-Bas), 27 décembre 2007

Texte

«His compositions are mainly folk-influenced, with classical touches resulting in a romantic and melodramatic music with nice harmonies and melodies.»

A new cd by Guido Del Fabbro (1980, Montréal). He is a core member of Fanfare Pourpour, who did a fantastic program with Lars Hollmer recently. Also he takes part in Rouge Ciel and Concorde Crash. In 2003 he recorded his first solo album (Carré de sable) for Ambiances Magnétiques. With Agrégats his second solo effort sees the light. For this one Del Fabbro composed and arranged a new set of 13 compositions composed between 1999 and 2007. Although they do not make up an suite, the pieces make up very naturally an organic whole. The pieces are played by an ensemble of 10 musicians playing accordion, clarinets, violin, flutes, trombone, cello, drums, percussion and some electronics and bird calls. He recruited musicians from very diverse backgrounds for this project. Postmodern or deconstructionist strategies have no grip on Del Fabbro. His compositions are mainly folk-influenced, with classical touches resulting in a romantic and melodramatic music with nice harmonies and melodies. Being avant garde is not what Del Fabbro is aiming at. Points or reference maybe be early Conventum or a Belgian group like Julverne from the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. Moissine is the exception, being an collective improvised interlude that is very much NOW. I wish the album had more of these moments. But Del Fabbro succeeds in evoking the ‘old’ music he is dreaming of and knows how to revive it without sounding nostalgic and without using cliches. On the other hand I must say that I hope the Del Fabbro’s next cd will contain more daring compositions.

blogue@press-3445 press@3445
27 décembre 2007
Par Dolf Mulder in Vital #607 (Pays-Bas), 27 décembre 2007

Texte

«New great stuff from Michel F Côté

New great stuff from Michel F Côté (Klaxon Gueule, Bruire, Flat Fourgonnette)! Although the compositions are teamwork, the music carries a clear stamp from mister Côté who did the mixing and montage. Côté (drums, pocket trumpet, arrangements) is in the company here of Bernard Falaise (electric guitar), Alexandre St-Onge (doublebass) and Jesse Levine on electric organ. Levine is the new element on this CD. A young jazz musician from Boston, who plays some very demented and weird organ. He played in the klezmer band Black Ox Orkestar, and also with noise-rock artists Fly Pan Am and live Hip-Hop ensemble Kalmunity. With the impro-sextet Balai Mécanique he recorded an album released on No Type in 2003. Listening to (juste) Claudette what strikes me first is that again the music has a certain slowness and primitiveness that characterizes also earlier work of Côté. Strange instrumental rock, that moves ahead with a slow but steady groove. Within and in contrast with the simple beat or groove played by Côté and St-Onge, we hear some very free and distorted playing from above all the guitarist and organ player. Very amusing. But from time to time I wish the drummer would also take part in the madness of Levine and Falaise, who play very aggressive, edgy and far out. One has the feeling this music has its roots in rock and blues but is never sounds like that. In the track Descente Central they take a break and they show themselves from a more serious side with a rendition of Morton Feldman’s String Quartet (II). The CD closes with a composition of Vincent Gallo.

blogue@press-3446 press@3446
21 décembre 2007

La boutique en ligne reste ouverte mais nous ne serons pas beaucoup présents durant la période des fêtes pour traiter vos commandes… Nous serons de retour à la vitesse de croisière le 3 janvier 2008. Joyeuses fêtes!

blogue@nouv-8847 nouv@8847
21 décembre 2007
Par Kurt Gottschalk in Signal to Noise #48 (ÉU), 21 décembre 2007

Texte

«a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue.»

Lately some members of Montréal’s endlessly inventive Ambiances Magnétiques collective have been turning to songbooks south of their border. Last year saw a tribute to Charles Mingus by bassist Normand Guilbeault and clarinetist Robert Marcel Lepage’s excellent Pee Wee Russell album, as well as the second CD by the Trio Derome Guilbeault Tanguay, which included pieces by Sonny Clark, Duke Ellington, Lee Konitz and Cole Porter. The latter’s new release is a live DVD that captures a strong set featuring compositions by Ellington, Eric Dolphy, Lennie Tristano and Fats Waller, as well as a piece by pianist Misha Mengelberg, who certainly deserves to be in such company. Derome himself is no stranger to jazz standards — his longstanding Évidence trio (with Tanguay and bassist Pierre Cartier, who’s proven to be something of a crooner as well in the last couple years) is built from the Thelonious Monk repertoire. The new trio started out performing original compositions (and two Derome pieces are included here), but it’s more than welcome to hear a band this strong taking on the classics. And if their The Feeling of Jazz lacked a little oomph, in front of an audience they are solid and graceful, and the set list is well-chosen. Derome takes on Ellington’s Fleurette Africaine and Waller’s Jitterbug Waltz (hands down two of the loveliest melodies of their era) on flute, and plays a confident saxophone on Dolphy’s Miss Ann and 245 (another nice choice) and Guilbeault is lyrical (if a bit under-miked) throughout. But the main reason to watch (as opposed to simply listening) this set is Tanguay. Like New York’s Tom Rainey, he is subtle yet always pushing; his finesse is easy to miss on record, but watching him just affirms how on his toes he always is. The video is well-shot, with multiple cameras, soft white lighting and very good sound, a standout release in the label’s ever-growing catalogue.

blogue@press-3441 press@3441
20 décembre 2007
Par Mike Chamberlain in Hour (Québec), 20 décembre 2007

Texte

«An absolute treat.»

Disclaimer: In my sometimes humble opinion, turntable artist Martin Tétreault is a musical genius. As a result, I find it hard to be completely objective about his music, which is inventive and funny and very, very musical. This encounter with wunderkind Koala took place at the 2005 Victoriaville festival and, as Tétreault explains in the liner notes, was the fruit of intense planning between the two. The term “sound films” that Tétreault uses to describe the seven tracks is quite apt, as these are collages composed from the record collections and fertile imaginations of Tétreault and Koala. An absolute treat.

blogue@press-3443 press@3443
14 décembre 2007
Par Bruce Lee Gallanter in Downtown Music Gallery (ÉU), 14 décembre 2007

Texte

«This is an extraordinary trio: exciting, intense, focused and at times scary.»

Fenaison is a group committed to the making of new music that is texturally driven, improvised, exploratory, and boundary crossing. Performing with intuition, ingenuity, and integrity, Fenaison pushes the limits of the anticipated and the accepted with their dynamic and intensely unique performances. Members of the ensemble come from such diverse backgrounds as classical composition, noise music, contemporary performance, improvisation, electronic music and jazz. This ensemble has been heralded as both exciting and innovative.

Fenaison feature Charity Chan on extended piano, Rémy Belanger de Beauport on amplified cello, flute & electronics and Chris Covlin on saxes. I met Ms. Chan when she played at the Ambiances Magnétiques fest at The Stone earlier this year (2007) and was most impressed with her playing. She studied with Fred Frith at Mills College and this is the first disc she is involved with on the Quebec-based AM label. This is an extraordinary trio: exciting, intense, focused and at times scary. Each sound is perfectly balanced within their dream-like haze of constant surprises. Some of this is noisy, but all of it is quite fascinating.

blogue@press-3442 press@3442