La boutique des nouvelles musiques

Artistes Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay est compositeur et interprète à la guitare basse et aux dispositifs de traitements sonores, en solo et au sein de groupes variés. Il est aussi membre du collectif londonien Loop. Sa musique est disponible chez empreintes DIGITALes et Ora.

Il a étudié la composition auprès de Michel Tétreault, Marcelle Deschênes et Jonty Harrison, la guitare basse avec Jean-Guy Larin, Sylvain Bolduc et Michel Donato, l’analyse dans les classes de Michel Longtin et Stéphane Roy, et les techniques de studio auprès de Francis Dhomont, Robert Normandeau et Jean Piché.

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay est présentement professeur de composition et d’improvisation à la University of Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU). Il a travaillé en musique populaire comme réalisateur et comme bassiste, et s’intéresse beaucoup à l’informatique musicale.

Il aime passer du temps en famille, boire du thé Oolong, feuilleter les dictionnaires, lire de la prose, et faire de longues randonnées. Fondateur du collectif no-tv, il ne possède pas de téléviseur fonctionnel.

En 2016 il reçoit le Prix Jules-Léger de la nouvelle musique de chambre décerné par le Conseil des arts du Canada.

[iv-18]

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Montréal (Québec), 1975

Résidence: Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU)

  • Compositeur
  • Interprète (basse électrique, ordinateur)

info@pierrealexandretremblay.com

Ensembles associés

Sur le web

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU), 3 août 2013
Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU), 3 août 2013
  • Jean-François Denis accepte (pour Pierre Alexandre Tremblay visible sur le grand écran) le Prix Opus 2013-14 du «Disque de l’année — musiques actuelle, électroacoustique» lors du 18e Gala des Prix Opus à la Salle Bourgie à Montréal. Les animateurs de la soirée sont Pierre Vachon et Stanley Péan, photo: Anis Hammoud / CQM, Montréal (Québec), 1 février 2015
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay (sur l’écran d’un iPad tenu par Jean-François Denis) acceptant le Prix Opus 2010-11 du «Disque de l’année — musiques actuelle, électroacoustique» lors du 15e Gala des Prix Opus à la Salle Bourgie à Montréal. L’animateur de la soirée est Mario Paquet (à droite), photo: CQM, Montréal (Québec), 29 janvier 2012
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Alex Bonney, Paris (France), 24 mai 2011
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Alex Bonney, Strasbourg (Bas-Rhin, France), 24 mai 2011
  • Jonty Harrison, Jean-François Denis, Denis Smalley, Pierre Alexandre Tremblay en répétition pour le concert empreintes DIGITALes @ 20: Cinema for the Ears dans le cadre du Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, photo: Scott Hewitt, Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU), 24 novembre 2010
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (Angleterre, RU), 17 janvier 2009
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Étienne Deslières
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Étienne Deslières

Apparitions

Collection QB / CQB 1618, CQB 1618_NUM / 2016

Compléments

Bruce’s Fingers / BF 133 / 2016

La presse en parle

HCMF 2018: HISS@10, Kudzu, Fast Gold Butterflies

Simon Cummings, 5:4, 22 novembre 2018

[…] The only other work of substance in this concert was Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s Bucolic & Broken. And what substance! Here, and only here, was a true demonstration of the surround capabilities of HISS. But it wasn’t just the positioning of sounds, Tremblay’s choice of sources – ranging from a scratching pencil to a boiling kettle to birdsong to a tinkling piano gesture to a woman walking her dog – were superbly imaginative, and the way these were juxtaposed into a strange structural form was unconventional but completely convincing. It wasn’t in the usual sense acousmatic, Tremblay instead presenting these sounds as found sound objects arranged into a kind of spacialised collage. But what set the piece apart from almost everything else in this concert (and, perhaps, most concerts) was its demonstration of Tremblay’s very obvious playfulness and a palpable sense of wonder at the sounds he’s working with. For electronic music to be as accomplished as this while being so much fun is a rare combination. […]

For electronic music to be as accomplished as this while being so much fun is a rare combination.

HCMF 2018: United Instruments of Lucilin, Harriet

Simon Cummings, 5:4, 21 novembre 2018

[…] In Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s electroacoustic Un fil rouge the electronics were for the most part uncannily present – which is to say that they felt like a tangible yet invisible additional performer on stage. They manifested most prominently in a recurring motif, extending the ensemble’s tutti accents into an accelerating (and occasionally decelerating) sequence of impacts. This motif recurred so often, in fact, that it became in essence a refrain, between which were a number of episodes providing a contrast to its impetus and momentum. Though they exhibited far less energy, these episodes were the most striking moments of the piece, Tremblay more prepared to let the material drift and linger, resulting in beautiful, dreamy sequences. Even when they were pushed along, though, this episodes remained distinct in the way they seemed more ragged, the result of playful spontaneity driven by an exciting bubbling sense of abandon. […]

… in beautiful, dreamy sequences.

HCMF 2016: Seth Parker Woods […]

Simon Cummings, 5:4, 26 novembre 2016

Friday at HCMF began with a recital by rising star cellist Seth Parker Woods. I’ve had the opportunity to see Woods play once before (at HCMF 2014) and the experience was a highly impressive one, so I was very much looking forward to seeing him in action again. He did not disappoint, performing four challenging works, two of which involved live electronics. […] The unquestionable highlight of the concert, though, was Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s asinglewordisnotenough3 (invariant), which provided both a composition masterclass in its seamless, aurally non-hierarchical interaction between acoustic and electronic, as well as a performance masterclass in its bravura display of frantic virtuosity from Woods. The work’s narrative was excellent, progressing through a series of evolving episodes each fuelled by the cello, many of them rhythmically taut (though never sounding metrically fixed) with a tendency later to expand out into more sustained soundscapes where the cello’s material was more buoyant. Utterly thrilling, and Woods unstoppable performance was outstanding. […]

… a composition masterclass in its seamless, aurally non-hierarchical interaction between acoustic and electronic…

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.