La boutique des nouvelles musiques

Solitary Pleasures Fortner Anderson

Les 35 poèmes de Solitary Pleasures proviennent d’un journal poétique tenu par Fortner Anderson entre le 27 avril 2004 et le 26 avril 2005. Ces poèmes parlent des obsessions, des fantasmes et des rencontres vécues par le poète. Michel F Côté, Sam Shalabi et Alexandre St-Onge accompagnent la lecture des poèmes par le biais d’une intense orchestration de sons d’origine électronique et acoustique. De brefs sursauts de musculation polyrithmique et d’excitations sonores se conjugent en une expérience de libération salutaire, de plaisirs solitaires.

  • &records
  • ET 15 / 2011
  • Durée totale: 48:12
  • &pages
  • ETPAGES AVRIL / 2011
  • ISBN 9782981285706
  • 86 pages

Solitary Pleasures

Fortner Anderson

La presse en parle

Fortresses of Solitude

Abby Paige, Montreal Review of Books, no 39, 21 septembre 2012

[…] While most of us are accustomed to reading short bits of text these days (140 characters, anyone?), many are nonetheless unaccustomed to the pace and attention required by the short bits of text that make up most poetry. Consequently, some poets are finding innovative methods to trip up the reader and demand a more considered interaction with the text. Fortner Anderson’s Solitary Pleasures is as much an art book as a poetry book, and haphazard typeface is the approach it uses to slow down the reader. Designer Fabrizio Gilardino has stamped each page by hand, letter by letter, using different font sizes and letter cases. He then altered the text digitally to create or preserve the appearance of errors and edits. The resulting text is impossible to scan like conventional printing. It must be studied and is, in fact, a bit hard on the eyes. Its unevenness mimics handwriting, making the words more like images, forcing us, almost like new readers, to proceed slowly and meticulously.

The poems themselves, taken from Anderson’s 2004 daybook, chronicle the mundanity of daily life, punctuated by moments of clarity, awe, or lament. “I did seventy five crunche / nude / before breakfast,” begins the entry from July 19th. Later the same day, the speaker and a friend discuss how one can never know the mind “and must remain / content / with an evershifting vantage / as we look into from the shadows / which we longingly call / ourselves.” There is a certain voyeuristic pleasure in these poems; they fittingly feel like reading someone’s diary, and part of the drive to keep reading is the promise of discovery. That promise doesn’t always pay off, but here that unevenness feels immediate and true. (…)

There is a certain voyeuristic pleasure in these poems; they fittingly feel like reading someone’s diary, and part of the drive to keep reading is the promise of discovery.

Snowed In

Ed Pinsent, The Sound Projector, 28 juillet 2012

An Aerie Skit

Two more of the items from the & Records label of Montréal which arrived here 20 January 2012. The record Ave W (&10) is credited to Tiari Kese, who apparently plays all the instruments — keyboards, French horn, electronics and samples, but it’s more likely to be all the work of Michel F Côté, who’s a Canadian electro-acoustic composer. A biography of alleged Bulgarian Tiari Kese can be found online, but with its Stockhausen, Beatles and Debord connections it’s all too good to be true and is probably just another internet hoax. The record does have one glorious track title, Dreams of Spartacus’s Spacecraft, but I mostly found it a rather turgid listen, directionless and shapeless digital layers of drone that amount to less and less the more they’re piled up. The instrument-playing has been processed and denormalised to an extreme degree, sucking the humanity out of everything until we’re left with echoed and orphaned horn tones floating aimlessly on a sea of samples, light distortion and glitch.

The City Wears a Furry Hat

Even less enjoyable is Solitary Pleasures (&records &15) by Fortner Anderson. It comprises several short 90-second vocal recits by the poet Anderson while accompanied by electro-acoustic noise played by a non-jazz trio of Alexandre St-Onge, Sam Shalabi, and Michel F Côté again, this time playing the drums. The release accompanies a book of poems published at the same time. We’ve encountered Fortner Anderson before in TSP15 where we noted the baffling Six Silk Purses, recordings of his spoken word exploits provided to sound artists to add their musical interpretations; in fact the same musicians were on that release too. Fortner’s short couplets are expressed here in diary form, each segment beginning with a calendar date announced in solemn tones, before proceeding with his free-form observations such as “I had forgotten the calculus of transcendence…”, alternating with mini-stories about life in the city and the characters he meets. It all feels oddly old-fashioned, like one of the forgotten Beats. Fortner attempts some jazzy syncopation in his delivery, even as the music drags itself along like a three-legged dog on a hot afternoon. Kenneth Patchen it ain’t.

It all feels oddly old-fashioned, like one of the forgotten Beats.

Review

John Sobol, Canadian Review of Literature in Performance, no 4, 1 avril 2012

Poet Fortner Anderson pads about the city burning with hope, crying into his notebook and laughing out the side of his sidewalks. His new collection — a daybook titled Solitary Pleasures — takes twin form as both an intricately printed book and a CD featuring recorded recitations of 35 poems on a bed of musical nails. Fingernails bitten, painted, cracked, searching. The sound and echo of the city and its solitary pleasures, as painted by this sweet-singing adventurer of the everyday.

Read, first — each page, each word, each letter carefully handcrafted and pressed by designer Fabrizio Gilardino — the melodic honesty of these blunt and blushing snapshot poems delights, invites, launching tiny fireworks with words of fire. Compassionate. Carnivalesque. Curious.

Listened to, later — Fortner’s rasp supported by the lucid musical dreams of Alex St-Onge (bass), Sam Shalabi (electric guitar) and Michel F Coté (drums and microphones), these same poems turn bleak, amidst liminal harmonic musings they hector and hurt. Contemptuous. Coruscating. Cutting.

The city wrestles with hard feeling. The poet strolls into scene after scene licking up scattered personal truths like hits of acid. We share his trips via the ear, the eye, transforming solitary pleasures into momentary mutual metamorphoses.

It helps.

We share his trips via the ear, the eye, transforming solitary pleasures into momentary mutual metamorphoses.

Music Reviews

Lawrence Joseph, Montreal Mirror, 22 mars 2012

Diary of a year in verse / Spring and summer months over-represented / Anderson’s declarative voice backed by minimalist noise trio / Shalabi, guitar / St-Onge, sensitive bass and electronics / Côté, drums and eerie microphone feedback / Daily mundane observations / Bodily functions, scenes on sidewalks, cats in the park / Alternate with metaphysical ramblings / Friend’s experience with chemotherapy / Very Montréal / Weather references / Drive to the country / Talk of the Casa, Pharmaprix and drinking. 8/10

Very Montréal

Journal d’écoute

François Couture, Monsieur Délire, 25 janvier 2012

Un bel enregistrement au studio 270, avec le poète Fortner Anderson qui récite et habite ses textes (présentés comme des extraits d’un journal intime), accompagné des improvisateurs Michel F Côté, Alexandre St-Onge et Sam Shalabi, soit presque Klaxon Gueule. Des textes sombres, des musiques qui grincent.

Un bel enregistrement avec le poète Fortner Anderson qui récite et habite ses textes

Review

Frans de Waard, Vital, no 812, 26 décembre 2011

Some entirely different is the music of Fortner Anderson, although its better to say the poetry and a bit of music of the person in question. We have reviewed his work before. Here a work of thirty-five short pieces, like a diary. Each piece starts with a date introduction and something about that date, along with improvised music of Michel F Côté, Sam Shalabi and Alexandre St-Onge on drums, guitar and electronics. Unlike Six Silk Purses: The Poems Of Fortner Anderson, this has however less variation in the execution. The voice is the same throughout and the music is all highly freely improvised. Some of these poems are quite nice, or even funny and sometimes sad (about a friend on chemo) but I wonder if I rather read the book (which is apparently also available, but I didn’t see it) and hear the music separately, but perhaps I am just not that much a poetry kind of guy. Or a CD single would be more in place and not one that lasts forty-eight minutes.

The voice is the same throughout and the music is all highly freely improvised.

En bref, quelques albums en journal d’écoute

Maxime Bouchard, Jazz à crédit, 30 novembre 2011

Intrigante proposition que celle-là. Du spoken-word, très proche de la poésie du quotidien, petites vignettes supportées par une orchestration simple de musique électronique et acoustique. La voix est juste, posée, pénétrante, la musique post-industrielle, rêche… très bon!

La voix est juste, posée, pénétrante, la musique post-industrielle, rêche… très bon!

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.