La boutique des nouvelles musiques

Callas: La diva et le vinyle Robert Marcel Lepage, Martin Tétreault

Maria Callas, vingt ans après sa mort en 1977, se retrouve sur un disque conçu et produit à Montréal. En effet Robert Marcel Lepage et Martin Tétreault nous présente un premier album duo intitulé Callas: la diva et le vinyle. De manière inattendue et facinante, ils évoquent Callas dans un mélange musical à la fois lyrique et humoristique. Deux Rossini contemporains jouant sérieusement de petits riens, rythmés de clins d’œil amicaux. Les combinaisons fusent: grincement et clics-clacs, vitesses normales, ralenties ou accélérées dans les jeux de vinyles: apparition saugrenue d’un cours de langue; une clarinette joyeuse ou tendre, naviguant sur la large tessiture entre le grave et l’aigu, complice dans son phrasé et son rubato avec des fragements de la voix de Callas. Le duo qu’ils forment vise à inscrire cette interprète, ses disques et la phonographie dans la mouvance des musiques actuelles ou des musiques de création, dans les métissages toujours possibles entre l’opéra archaïque et l’art sonore contemporain, entre l’improvisation et la structure de composition, entre le jeu musical en direct et son traitement par l’esthétique des sons enregistrés.

Callas: La diva et le vinyle

Robert Marcel Lepage, Martin Tétreault

La presse en parle

  • Vincent Lecoeur, Octopus, no 27, 1 mars 2004
  • Richard Cochrane, Earscape, no 3, 1 mars 2000
  • Nick Mott, Audion, no 42, 1 mars 2000
  • Richard Cochrane, Avant, no 10, 1 décembre 1999
    An unexpectedly lyrical, flowing album of improvisations packed with melodic invention…
  • Richard Moule, Exclaim!, 1 mai 1999
    … a hilarious, irreverent playful tribute…
  • Art Lange, The Wire, no 180, 1 février 1999
    My vote for best improv disc of the year.
  • Art Lange, Fanfare, 1 janvier 1999
    …Opera lovers… may not appreciate the wit and sometimes mesmerizing appeal of this program, but if you enjoy any type of electroacoustic, quasi-improvisational music, this might just be up your alley.
  • Pierre Durr, Revue & Corrigée, no 38, 1 décembre 1998
  • Henryk Palczewski, Informator “Ars” 2, no 24, 1 novembre 1998
  • George Zahora, Splendid E-Zine, 5 octobre 1998
    Lepage and Tétreault deserve full credit for a thought-provoking reinterpretation of the Diva’s art.
  • Nicolas Tittley, Voir, 6 août 1998
    … Tantôt solennel et poignant… tantôt absurde et humoristique… La Diva et le Vinyle risque de dérouter les fans d’opéra. Tant mieux. Bon.
  • Chris Yurkiw, Montreal Mirror, 9 juillet 1998
  • Lise Bissonnette, Le Devoir, 20 juin 1998
  • Alain Brunet, La Presse, 13 juin 1998
  • Rubberneck, no 28, 1 février 1998

Critique

Vincent Lecoeur, Octopus, no 27, 1 mars 2004

Ou comment détourner par grincements, claquements, vitesses ralenties la voix de Maria Callas. Prélèvements et emprunts colorés par une clarinette enjouée ou tout en souplesse. La voix de la diva était, selon le mot d’une auditrice de ses débuts, à mi-chemin entre clarinette et hautbois. Léger et pervers.

Review

Richard Cochrane, Earscape, no 3, 1 mars 2000

Here’s the deal: take a world-famous opera diva. Give her recordings to an iconoclastic turntable artiste. Introduce him to a brown-toned clarinettist and leave the two alone together for a while. The result? An unexpectedly lyrical, flowing album of improvisations packed with melodic invention, and nary a camp postmodernist joke to be found. It most assuredly is a funny old world.

There are one or two gags, of course — there could hardly not have been. The first thing you hear is Callas warming up. Shortly afterwards, Tétreault puts on a teach-yourself-Italian disk full of opera house cliches and leaves Lepage to play an uncharacteristically lumpy solo over the top. Nothing lasts for very long (shortest track: 28 seconds), and Tétreault shows precious little respect for the compositions Callas was originally performing. At one point, he even mimics the soprano perfoming a descending scale by slowing the turntable down with his finger. It all sounds like a recipe for knockabout cultural reference humour but, astonishingly, such impulses seem merely to be registered in order to keep them in check.

Instead, Tétreault and Lepage seem intent on making a record of beautiful music. Of course, Callas’ voice is a fantastic sound-source, and rendered atonal, quavering and unpredictable as it is here it is a musical instrument up to the task of interacting with Lepage. The latter plays with a scrupulously clean classical tone throughout, enunciating his ostinati and curlicues of scales with careful precision. At this disk’s finest moments, Lepage seems to curl his clarinet around Callas’ voice, the two locked in an impossible, or at least implausible, counterpoint.

This also brings Tétreault’s acheivement to the fore. He seems to have given over considerable time to the preparation of this disk — perhaps he did not, but if not then his work here is all the more remarkable. What he manages to do is to take apart Callas’ voice, to use the different elements of it in different pieces, yet to do so without it becoming a gimmick. Most of the pieces here have real musical interest, not just novelty value. Part of the credit for that goes to Lepage, because without an attentive and sensitive duo partner this would have been unlistenable. Part, however, must go to Tétreault for having the imagination and musicality to carry it off. Or then again, perhaps this conventional musicality is all part of another kind of joke, a sort of meta-joke about making a record of opera diva cutups with a straight face. This is a geniune ambiguity for a lot of this disk, the confusion between irony and sincerity, and that too is something of a strength in comparison with all those earnestly wry referential works which tend to dissolve into kitsch.

Review

Nick Mott, Audion, no 42, 1 mars 2000

Basically the concept of this is: a duo playing turntables, lots of scratches, pops, clicks and squeaks, and varispeed opera vocals in improvisation against clarinet. Okay, it sounds nice and interesting for a while, becoming tedious as the idea wears thin. A shame, as it’s a good Dada idea when it works, and the parts that do work sound really disturbing and "out there".

Review

Richard Cochrane, Avant, no 10, 1 décembre 1999

Here’s the deal: take a world-famous opera diva. Give her recordings to an iconoclastic turntable artiste. Introduce him to a brown-toned clarinettist and leave the two alone together for a while. The result? An unexpectedly lyrical, flowing album of improvisations packed with melodic invention, and nary a camp postmodernist joke to be found. It most assuredly is a funny old world. There are one or two gags, of course - there could hardly not have been. The first thing you hear is Callas warming up. Shortly afterwards, Tétreault puts on a teach-yourself-ltalian disk full of opera house cliches and leaves Lepage to play an uncharacteristically lumpy solo over the top. Nothing lasts for very long (shortest track: 28 seconds), and Tétreault shows perecious little respect for the compositions which Callas was originally performing. At one point, he even mimics the soprano perfoming a descending scale by slowing the turntable down with his finger. It all sounds like a recipe for knockabout cultural reference humour but, astonishingly. such impulses seem merely to be registered in order to keep them in check. Instead, Tétreault and Lepage seem intent on making a record of beautiful music. Of course. Callas’ voice is a fantastic sound-source, and rendered atonal, quavering and unpredictable as it is here it becomes a musical instrument up to the task of interacting with Lepage. The latter plays with a scrupulously clean classical tone throughout, enunciating his ostinati and curlicues of scales with careful precision. At this disk’s finest moments, Lepage seems to curl his clarinet around Callas’ voice, the two locked in an impossible, or at least implausible, counterpoint. This also brings Tétreaults acheivement to the fore. He seems to have given over considerable time to the preparation of this disk — perhaps he did not but if not then his work here is all the more remarkable. What he manages to do is to take apart Callas’ voice, to use the different elements of it in different pieces, yet to do so without it becoming a gimmick. Most of the pieces here have real musical interest not just novelty value. Part of the credit for that goes to Lepage because without an attentive and sensitive duo panner this would have been unlistenable. Part, however, must go to Tétreault for having the imagination and musicality to carry it off. Or then again, perhaps this conventional musicality is all part of another kind of joke, a sort of meta-joke about making a record of opera diva cutups with a straight face. This is a genuine ambiguity for a lot of this disk, the confusion between irony and sincerity, and that too is something of a strength in comparison with all those earnestly wry referential works which tend to dissolve into kitsch.

An unexpectedly lyrical, flowing album of improvisations packed with melodic invention…

Review

Richard Moule, Exclaim!, 1 mai 1999

Another set of dispatches from this Montréal collective of musique actuel-ites who continue to dazzle with their transgressive music. It is music that balances improvisation and composition in a singular fusion of jazz, rock, modern classical, musique concrète and turntablism. Callas: La diva et le vinyle is part musical and phonographic history lesson and part plunderphonics. 1997 was the 20th anniversary of opera diva Maria Callas’s death, and the 100th anniversary of Emil Berliner, who started EMI Records in Montréal. On Callas: La diva et le vinyle, clarinettist Lepage and DJ turntablist assassin, Tétreault have created a hilarious, irreverent playful tribute to these historical recorded events. Taking old recordings of Callas, Tétreault scratches, cuts and pitch shifts fragments of her voice, at one point making it sound like a fire alarm, while Lepage compliments Callas’s voice with alternating lyrically melancholic and joyous improvised phrasings. Callas: La diva et le vinyle is an exciting meeting of multiple juxtapositions: between old and new voices, between the stylised rituals of opera and the freedom of contemporary sound art and between live and recorded music.

… a hilarious, irreverent playful tribute…

Broken music maker

Art Lange, The Wire, no 180, 1 février 1999

New Music is where you find it, but for heavy electroacoustics and crosscultural blends of free improvisation and song. Montréal is presently the place to be. Turntablist Martin Tétreault works at the centre of the city’s beehive of musical activity, alongslide a bevy of inquisitive, explorative artists, such as guitarist René Lussier, saxophonist Jean Derome, vocalist/multi-intrumentalist Joane Hétu, keyboardist Diane Labrosse and percussionist Michel F Côté. A mix of studied intuition and wild experimentation, Tétreault’s hands-on approach to turntables is doubtless unlike any other you’ve heard. He collaborated tow of last year’s most engaging CDs Dur noyau dur with René Lussier (my vote for the best free Improv disc of the year) and Callas:La diva et le vinyle, a tongue-in-cheek deconstructivist homage to opera legend Maria Callas, recorded with clarinettist Robert Marcel Lepage. Tétreault didn’t come up throught the usual musical channels, wich might account for why he’s so different. As he relates in his fluent French-accented English, "I began in 1984, switching from fine art to music. To make it short, I was doing things in visual art, very minimalist stuff, cutting paper and things like that, and one day I decided to cut a record. At first it was not for music, it was only to cut something other than paper. But I put it on a turntable and thought, ’Wow, it works’ It was not something I planned, to become a musician, but just this very simple action completely changed my artistic direction. "Though he hadn’t heard any of HipHop’s pathbreaking turntablists, he immediatly jumped into the fray. A predilection for skewered stylistic juxtapositions and intensely textural, rather than rhythmical, effects asserted itself. "I was completely into New Music when I began," he says. "More recently I’ve listened to new DJ stuff like DJ Spooky, DJ Shadow— a little more commercial, but I think it’s interesting, very important for pop music. People want to introduce me to DJs that are more HipHop here in Montréal, but I know more about the work of Otomo Yoshihide, Christian Marclay, David Shea, that generation Christian Marclay and I played together in Montréal in 89, for a Broken Music exhibition. I met Otomo in that same period, I think it was 1991. He sent me tapes and asked me if I wanted to work with him. But he’s a very busy person. So last year I was in Japan to play with him and then he came to Canada and we did a tour. "

Working with so many different musicians and in so many varied settings, at home and on the road, challenges Tétreault to invent new sounds for each context. Yet he rarely includes random radio play among his sound effects, and eschews samplers or other electronic devices. He still concentrates on vinyl LPs and the turntable machinery itself as sound sources. " I consider the turntable to be a music instrument," he asserts. "Take the electric guitar, for instance. There’s no two guitars that sound the same, and it’s the same with turntables. I have some customised turntables with modified motors and speeds and so on, and more than 3000 records in my collection. Each record is classified by musical instrument—percussion, strings, electronics. spoken words, things like that When I work with panticular records, I go and make a kind of composition—let’s try this percussion sound with these strings if it’s for an improvising concert, I will work in that way, but other times it must be more precise. For example, Jean Derome’s Hommage à Georges Perec /Je me souviens) is a composition for big band, 13 musicians playing a kind of intentionally cliched 1950s music, and every part was written out except for mine. I was the only person who was free. So I created my part at home, and put stickers on the records for visual cueing, so that it’s very controlled, and I can repeat it at exactly the same way, the same speed, every time. On another project with René Lussier and Diane Labrosse, I played with prepared records and prepared needles—no musical quotations, only surface noise from the LP and things stuck on the record to make rhythmic effects. But that’s different from what I normally do, it’s more "musique d’objet". And I just completed a new solo CD done with only parasite noise from turntables—no scratching, only the sound of motors and things like that. Every project is different, because there are a lot of possibilities, and every time I say to myself I will try to do something different than before.

My vote for best improv disc of the year.

Review

Art Lange, Fanfare, 1 janvier 1999

And now — to borrow a phrase — for something completely different. Ambiances Magnétiques is an unusual record label from Montréal that specializes in documenting a group of Canadian electronic, electroacoustic, and improvising musicians. This disc features a Québécois experimental duo that has put together this off-the-wall homage to Maria Callas — sixteen short (most between two and four minutes in length) vignettes featuring Lepage’s fluid, Iyrical clarinet playing within a sometimes sensitive, sometimes raucous electronic environment created by Tétreault. The Callas voice appears at various points in the proceedings via LP, but seldom in recognizable form; rather, it is a haunted, disembodied presence, variously distorted and pulverized by hands-on manipulation of the turntable. Occasionally audible fragments of an aria slice through the sonic debris, but for the most part her singing is transformed into pseudoelectronic timbres, cartoonlike shrieks, pitches sped up and slowed down, isolated vocal attacks, and notes repeated obsessively. Tétreault doesn’t stop there, however, adding into the mix surface noise from the LPs as percussive accompaniment, plus excerpts from an English-ltalian language recording (with an opera theme), an exercise LP, Grofé’s Grand Canyon Suite, even barking dogs — all while Lepage offers an attractive, improvised obbligato.

Opera lovers — and I imagine Callas fanatics are a particularly devoted bunch — may not appreciate the wit and sometimes mesmerizing appeal of this program, but if you enjoy Cage’s Europeras or any type of electroacoustic, quasi-improvisational music, this might just be up your alley.

…Opera lovers… may not appreciate the wit and sometimes mesmerizing appeal of this program, but if you enjoy any type of electroacoustic, quasi-improvisational music, this might just be up your alley.

Critique

Pierre Durr, Revue & Corrigée, no 38, 1 décembre 1998

Vingt ans apres sa mort, la Callas fête le centenaire du disque, ou plutôt celui de la fondation de EMI, par Emil Berliner. Cette rencontre post mortem est initiée par un des sorciers du travail sur platine, le Québecois Martin Tétreault et par Robert Marcel Lepage, autre éminent magnétiseur d’ambiances et clarinettiste de son état. On se souvient aussi du titre Maria Callas, de Christian Marclay (in More encore), il y a plus de dix ans et récemment réédité. Les deux approches n’ont rien à voir. Marclay cherchait à saisir l’esprit et l’art de la Callas en quelques trois minutes et une seconde. Nos deux Quebécois nous proposent plutôt une sorte de portrait décliné au travers d’une quinzaine de pièces, de la Diva et du culte qui l’entourait, à la fois malicieusement et tendrement, et non sans une certaine délicatesse, sans pour autant renier leur propre art, celui du scratch, de la manipulation de platines pour l’un, celui de son instrument, tour à tour lyrique, mélancolique ou enjoué.

Review

George Zahora, Splendid E-Zine, 5 octobre 1998

I think the phrase “unlikely tribute” sums this up well — an hommage to opera diva Maria Callas built from clarinet music and turntable manipulations of Callas in performance. Robert Lepage uses his clarinet’s range to evoke and accompany Callas’ voice, while Martin Tétreault scratches, loops, cuts and drops the recorded Diva into the mix. Not everyone is going to like this, or understand it, but it’s very intriguing nonetheless. Tétreault isn’t merely a scratch-happy DJ; his contributions to these pieces depend as much upon changes in pitch, uneven rotation and the pops, clicks and aural eccentricities of the vinyl medium as they do on back-spinning and other more overt record handling — his slow-wind on Maria La Casse is particularly striking. He seems, too, to be working with a massive, older turntable rather than the shiny, feature-laden 1200s favored by most DJs. Lepage, meanwhile, uses his instrument to manipulate and counterpoint the moods and phrases Callas establishes, turning happiness into melancholia and vice versa. Sometimes, when the vinyl-recorded Callas is delivered in short, staccato bursts while the clarinet is sustaining long, gentle notes, it’s hard to tell who’s who. Other extraneous noises — an instructional opera record and some live audience “response” being the most obvious — add a sense of whimsy to the disc. Though its premise might reek of art-wank and seem disrespectful to Callas, La Diva… is ultimately both well-intentioned and well-executed, and Lepage and Tétreault deserve full credit for a thought-provoking reinterpretation of the Diva’s art.

Lepage and Tétreault deserve full credit for a thought-provoking reinterpretation of the Diva’s art.

Critique

Nicolas Tittley, Voir, 6 août 1998

On a déjà dit de la voix de Maria Callas qu’elle s’apparentait à la clarinette, et c’est probablement ce qui a séduit le clarinettiste Robert Marcel Lepage, qui lui rend ici hommage en compagnie du maître des tourne-disques Martin Tétreault Ce dernier puise à même l’œuvre phonographique de la diva, qu’il dépèce et remonte de manière syncopée et déroutante en y ajoutant une foule de sons sur lesquels Lepage plane joyeusement. Tantôt solennel et poignant (Calarinette), tantot absurde et humoristique (Le Système d’alarme Callas), La Diva et le Vinyle risque de dérouter les fans d’opéra Tant mieux. 3. 5/5

… Tantôt solennel et poignant… tantôt absurde et humoristique… La Diva et le Vinyle risque de dérouter les fans d’opéra. Tant mieux. Bon.

Compact Discs

Chris Yurkiw, Montreal Mirror, 9 juillet 1998

But it’s bad if you got attached to Des pas’s more traditional "quoting," although you can find some of that on his cut-ups of opera icon Maria Callas’s recordings, with clarinettist Robert Marcel Lepage. Both7/10

Bonheur de pointe

Lise Bissonnette, Le Devoir, 20 juin 1998

Les viniers et les plats de croustilles étaient vides, les chandelles s’épuisaient aussi, il fallait se résigner. La soirée Callas que la Cinémathèque de Montréal avait programmée le 9 juin serait reportée (au 26 juin que je vous conseille) pour cause de panne d’électricité dans le quartier. Le climat vaguement surréaliste des lieux se prêtait bien, toutefois, au lancement par la Phonothèque québécoise du disque Callas, la Diva et le Vinyle, tissage sonore indescriptible du clarinettiste Robert Marcel Lepage et de son compère Martin Tétreault qui se définit comme «disc jockey et instrumentiste de la platine». Pas besoin d’Hydro-Québec, ce soir-là, pour qu’il tire d’un vieil enregistrement en microsillon de Lucia di Lammermoor, en y baladant à la main l’aiguille du gramophone, une sorte de «voix d’outre-vinyle» de la Callas qui «passe à travers tout».

Tout en demeurant fort accessibles au commun des mortels, les soirées de ce genre relèvent certes de la culture plus «pointue». Les films que la Cinémathèque vous offrira à nouveau cette semaine et que j’ai eu le privilège de visionner à la maison sont des documents de grand intérêt, mais on peut aimer l’opéra, la Callas et la musique en général sans aller aussi loin. L’un, intitulé Diva Maria, Entretien avec Werner Schroeter, consigne le témoignage du cinéaste allemand qui, au milieu d’une adolescence troublée, découvre la voix de la Callas et s’y attache au point où elle déclenche sa vocation de réalisateur et de metteur en scène d’opéras scéniques. La puissance de la rencontre a été telle, dit Werner Schroeter, qu’elle lui a «sauvé la vie». L’autre film, Écouter Callas, réunit sur un plateau sept experts qui devisent de la discothèque idéale de Callas, échangent leurs connaissances mais aussi leurs jugements sur l’évolution de sa voix, sur les moments divins et les moments ratés, qu’il lui arrivait certes de connaître aussi.

Les deux films ont été tournés en une seule soirée dans un studio de télévision à Paris, et programmés sur la chaîne franco-allemande Arte en septembre 1997, pour le vingtième anniversaire de la mort de Maria Callas.

Le montage, typiquement français, est plus cérébral que la conversation, souvent passionnante et où s’accumulent mille enseignements. La caméra ne connaît que deux ou trois mouvements, le cadrage est tout croche, certains invités disparaissent derrière une sorte d’écran transparent qui se veut artistique mais ne réussit qu’à être encombrant. Le pari est toutefois tenu, celui de nous amener à «écouter» Callas sans jamais la voir, à partir de disques et non de films, et en nous aidant de conversations qui portent pour l’essentiel sur sa voix plutôt que sur son troublant et fascinant personnage.

Et de là, on peut entreprendre d’autres voyages. Sur le plateau, par exemple, on retrouve Réal La Rochelle, le président de la Phonothèque québécoise dont je vous entretenais la semaine dernière, sans doute l’expert entre tous de la discographie de Callas. Étudiant en cinéma à Paris au début des années 60, M. LaRochelle avait eu le culot de lui écrire, tout bonnement aux soins du Covent Garden de Londres, pour requérir le privilège d’assister à un de ses enregistrements en studio, d’autant qu’il lui était impossible de se procurer les billets pour ses prestations publiques. Et il s’était retrouvé quelques mois plus tard salle Wagram, à Paris, à observer son travail en Tosca, ce qui déclencha chez lui un peu comme chez Werner Schroeter une vocation Callas qui l’a mené entre autres à son doctorat et à des publications importantes dont Callas, la Diva et le Vinyle, la POPularisation de l’opéra dans l’industrie du disque, paru en 1988 chez Triptyque, titre repris en partie par le disque de Tétreault et Lepage dont il signe d’ailleurs la présentation. Et plus récemment, mouture revue et augmentée de ce premier ouvrage, les éditions Christian Bourgois ont publié de lui, à Paris, Callas, l’opéra du disque, une merveille de travail savant rédigé de façon très personnelle. Vous y découvrirez, à travers la cantatrice, l’histoire de l’industrie du disque classique durant la deuxième moitié du siècle, un monde que les ventes de la Callas continuent de dominer vingt ans après sa mort. À la différence de tant de gens de culture, Réal LaRochelle ne regarde pas de haut «l’industrie culturelle», ses calculs et ses stratégies; il nous la fait découvrir indispensable, et peuplée de passionnés de leur matière.

Si vous habitiez en France, ce mélange d’enseignement et de divertissement de haut niveau vous aurait été accessible en direct de votre fauteuil, par les bons offices de la chaîne Arte qui, le 17 septembre dernier, mettait en ondes pas moins de quatre heures d’émissions regroupées sous le titre Thema Callas, dont certains films présentés récemment dans le cadre de notre vaillant Festival international de films sur l’art (FIFA). La «chaîne culturelle européenne», ainsi qu’elle se définit, présente actuellement à la Cinémathèque, jusqu’à la fin de juin, un échantillon de sa programmation qui ne fait pas rêver mais plutôt désespérer les affamés d’ici. Arte, on le sait, ne s’encombre pas et ne s’encombrera jamais de réclame commerciale, et ses bailleurs publics de fonds, en France et en Allemagne, ne lui font pas grief de sa minuscule part de marché. Conçue un peu comme un volet «recherche et développement» de la culture audiovisuelle, la chaîne n’a pas d’obligation de rentabilité mais en a une de qualité. Elle ne craint pas le «pointu» et a mission d’en offrir le choix au téléspectateur dont le menu habituel, derrière une apparente diversité, est surtout d’une effarante uniformité. Ainsi démontre-t-elle, depuis maintenant six ans, que la démocratisation de la culture est le contraire de sa bêtification, qu’elle signifie rendre le meilleur disponible à tous, et que petit écran peut aller loin.

Vous aurez lu quelque part que notre Société Radio-Canada, celle qui s’enorgueillit de préférer le gouret aux livres, celle qui a mis au point le style Snyder et n’a pas connu de plus grand chagrin que son émigration à Télé-Métropole, celle qui entre en indicible jouissance devant les cotes de sa «p’tite vie», celle qui se veut la fille publique de la télévision publique, songe à se dédouaner auprès des désespérés qui l’engueulent dans tous les lieux de culture en requérant du CRTC la permission de créer en parallèle une «chaîne culturelle» analogue à Arte. Bonne nouvelle? Peut-être pas. Dans son récent ouvrage sur la décadence de la télévision publique française, Remontrance à la ménagère de moins de 50 ans (Plon, 1998), l’animateur Bernard Pivot met en garde contre cette relégation des émissions de qualité dans un ghetto dont l’existence donne bonne conscience aux chaînes généralistes, les dégage de toute exigence culturelle et laisse ainsi libre cours à leur appétit de sottises payantes. La culture, se disent-elles désormais, il y a une chaîne pour ça.

Mais les regrets de M. Pivot, si nous pouvions un jour les éprouver, seraient un luxe. Car les dirigeants d’Arte, distinction majeure, ne sont pas les mêmes qui ont dégradé la télévision française. Ce qui nous menace, si la SRC obtient le mandat de créer un Arte canadien, c’est d’hériter d’un travesti, où la cote d’écoute continuera à tenir lieu de cerveau, car sa dictature est acceptée chez nous avec enthousiasme, conviction et fierté. L’idée derrière Arte est plutôt celle d’une rébellion continue contre les idées audio-visuelles reçues et d’une foi en l’intelligence et la curiosité des spectateurs. Il faudrait plutôt la confier, de façon autonome, à des gens capables de comprendre que quatre heures d’émissions sur Callas n’épuisent pas le sujet ni l’être humain qui les regarde, et désireux eux-mêmes d’en savoir plus. Ça se trouve, entres autres à la Cinémathèque.

Robert Marcel Lepage: la polyvalence assuméé. La Callas, un disc jockey et un clarinettiste

Alain Brunet, La Presse, 13 juin 1998

En création, la polyvalence est parfois suspecte. Lorsqu’elle est maitrîsée, cependant, elle devient un outil extraordinaire. Prenez le cas de Robert Marcel Lepage. Dessinateur aguerri, clarinettiste solide, improvisateur et compositeur, pointu ou populaire, d’aucune allégeance musicale, notre homme est un polyvalent qui s’assume. Ces dernières semaines, I’artiste lançait deux albums (étiquette Ambiances Magnétiques)… et il en a cinq autres en chantier! Et cela ne compte pas ses musiques de films ou celles des téléséries signées Réjean Tremblay. Frais et dispos, il se présente à La Presse. Étre charmant s’il en est, Robert Marcel Lepage n’a pas du tout l’allure speedée. On l’imagine passé maître dans l’art de gérer ses horaires. Asseyons-nous… Par quoi commencer, au juste?

Tiens! Commençons par le ptit dernier: Callas: la diva et le vinyle a été lancé ce mardi à la Phonothèque québécoise.

«Ce projet, raconte Lepage, fut initié par Réal Larochelle, spécialiste de la Callas et président de la Phonothèque. Il voulait se départir de sa collection de vinyles et que l’on fasse quelque chose avec ses disques de Maria Callas. Il a contacté Martin Tétreault et moi-méme. Nous avons accepté d’en faire un disque. «Pour travailler avec moi, Martin était la personne indiquée, un artiste trés sensible, un coloriste… et un d. j. . Jouer avec lui, c’est se retrouver dans un contexte propice à l’improvisation, très intéressant pour un clarinettiste. «La clarinette était aussi intéressante dans le contexte, parce que Maria Callas à déjà été comparée à l’instrument —lorsque la chanteuse s’était produite à New York pour la première fois (en 1954), Claudia Cassidy, une critique américaine, avait écrit que «sa voix était un mélange de clarinette et de hautbois». «Nous avons ainsi envisagé ce duo clarinette-Callas en dehors du contexte de l’opéra. On l’a fait un peu comme un disque de Jazz —ce qui explique le graphisme de la pochette, qui reprend l’imagerie Blue Note.»

Review

Rubberneck, no 28, 1 février 1998

The 15 pieces on La diva et le vinyle combine clarinet and record player in an affectionate excavation of the recorded works of Maria Callas. Lepage’s clarinet executes slow, melancholic curlicues against the locked grooves, speeded-up and slowed-down worn records, and general rough-house vinyl fetishism of Tétreault It’s billed as a collision between new and old, composed and improvised, opera and sound art, but the distinctions collapse into one another: it’s the sounds recorded decades ago, put through Tétreault’s sonic shredder, that grab the attenton. Callas’ voice was once described as midway between clarinet and oboe, but I found Lepage’s undeniably graceful contributions went nowhere special hovering and undulating in the air between my ears. Tétreault’s poignant collages, on the other hand combining Callas wiLh coarse swatches of sound proved far more thought-provoking listening.

Autres textes

Hollow Ear, Muska

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.