The New & Avant-garde Music Store

Sur une balançoire Joëlle Léandre, Gianni Lenoci

… désinvoltes, parfois acharnés, mais sans temps morts. La Scena Musicale, Québec

As of late, Montréal’s Ambiances Magnétiques label has been quite successful in the export market. Albums like Balançoire are the reason. The WholeNote, Canada

Recorded in Italy in 2003, this album celebrates the first meeting between French bassist Joëlle Léandre and Italian pianist Gianni Lenoci.

They offer a set of short improvised pieces, rich works freely developed, following an aesthetic residing somewhere between jazz and contemporary music. They move around in a highly-versatile musical space: the mood is given a highly-dynamic tone, at times soft, at times fiery, where exchanges are answered in harmony. The result of the daring combination of one of the great masters of improvisation and an artist showing a lot of potential, the intensity emanating from this duo knows no boundaries. As a matter of fact, Léandre admits that the duo is a format she feels very comfortable with. Always up to her own extraordinary standards, Léandre plays her instrument with great flexibility. She makes her bow vibrate and jump around and she puts a lot of passion in her playing, attacking the strings, delivering dizzying glissandi, occasionally using her voice as an extra instrument. Lenoci rummages through the scales of his piano, adds short tonal outbursts to contrasting minimal propositions, even occasionally resorting to silence. The first alliance between these two artists turns out to be quite fruitful. “Sur une balançoire will be, without any doubt, another pearl on the crown of Joëlle Léandre and the International breakthrough of Gianni Lenoci, because this disc is really fantastic”. —John Rottiers, Radio Central Antwerpen

Sur une balançoire

Joëlle Léandre, Gianni Lenoci

Some recommended items

In the press

  • Francesca Odilia Bellino, All About Jazz Italy, March 5, 2006
  • Serdar Karabati, Jazz, July 1, 2005
  • Marc Chénard, La Scena Musicale, no. 10:6, March 1, 2005
    … désinvoltes, parfois acharnés, mais sans temps morts.
  • Phil Ehrensaft, The WholeNote, no. 10:5, February 1, 2005
    As of late, Montréal’s Ambiances Magnétiques label has been quite successful in the export market. Albums like Balançoire are the reason.
  • Marc Chénard, Coda Magazine, no. 307, January 1, 2005
    … there is nothing of the traditional division of labor between lead voice and accompanist, but a “balanced” rapport between them, and hence the title, most probably.
  • Luc Bouquet, ImproJazz, no. 111, January 1, 2005
    Cette musique, donc, qui une fois passée, continue d’exister car elle représente l’instant, l’éphémère et, en conséquence, l’éternité.
  • François Nadon, Ici Montréal, December 2, 2004
    Les deux musiciens redéfinissent ce qu’est la beauté en musique improvisée.
  • Alex Dutilh, Jazzman, no. 108, December 1, 2004
    La fragilité d’un échange sans interdit, avec l’intensité de deux parcours savants.
  • Franck Médioni, Octopus, December 1, 2004
    L’image de la balançoire dit bien le balancement, le mouvement organique de la musique que ce duo de funambules tisse.
  • Francesco Martinelli, Musica Jazz, November 1, 2004
  • Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no. 44, October 1, 2004
  • Eric Normand, JazzoSphère, no. 23, October 1, 2004
    Sur une balançoire est une suite rêvée qui ne touche pas le sol et qui va librement dans l’air. Un coup de cœur.
  • BLG, Downtown Music Gallery, September 24, 2004
    Another wonderful collaboration from the consistently great Joëlle Léandre.
  • Thierry Bissonnette, Voir, September 23, 2004
    Un moment fort pour cette artiste intégrale.
  • François Dadon, Ici Montréal, September 9, 2004
    Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté.
  • François Dadon, Ici Montréal, September 9, 2004
    Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté.
  • Henryk Palczewski, Informator “Ars” 2, no. 40, September 1, 2004
  • Dolf Mulder, Vital, no. 435, August 18, 2004
    … you can feel the joy they must have had.
  • Les allumés du jazz, no. 11, March 1, 2004
    .

C’est ça… Joelle Léandre…

Francesca Odilia Bellino, All About Jazz Italy, March 5, 2006

[…] Diversissime le atmosfere di Sur une balançoire con la Léandre (contrabbasso e voce) e il pianista Gianni Lenoci (pianoforte e oggetti). Il titolo evoca una musica in sospensione, che si muove in quattordici tracce anonime come su un’altalena. Quattordici immagini scattate veloci, mosse, estemporanee, in bianco e nero. Il retroterra di Lenoci, pianista da sempre attento alla musica contemporanea, permea abbondantemente sonorità che ricordano a tratti un Morton Feldman, un Sylvano Bussotti e anche qualche rarefatta nota di Érik Satie. La potenza del suono della Léandre pare piegata. Coglie l’atmosfera rarefatta del piano, vi ci si avvicina, senza tuttavia mai sembrare completamente assorbita. È questo l’equilibrio instabile? È questo il vero (dis)equilibrio in Duo? È questo il gioco dei diversi in perenne rincorsa l’uno dell’altro? (3,5/5)

Review

Serdar Karabati, Jazz, July 1, 2005

Critique

Marc Chénard, La Scena Musicale, no. 10:6, March 1, 2005

Peu d’artistes peuvent se dire aussi prolifiques au chapitre des enregistrements que Madame Contrebasse en personne, Joëlle Léandre. Si bien qu’elle nous offre à peu près une nouvelle galette par mois. Bien qu’ayant fait ses premières armes dans le milieu de la musique contemporaine, c’est dans le milieu du jazz (ou du post free-jazz pourrait-on dire) qu’elle fait le gros de son boulot. Musicienne de rencontres par excellence, elle se retrouve aux côtés d’un pianiste sicilien, Gianni Lenoci. En quelque 46 minutes, les deux badinent allégrement, sans jamais trop bavarder (puisqu’il y a 14 plages). Compte tenu de sa propre formation musicale, la bassiste se sert davantage de son archet que du pizzicato, évitant ainsi le rôle traditionnel que son instrument tient en jazz. Ce faisant, les deux partenaires dialoguent en égaux plutôt que d’avoir le piano comme meneur et la contrebasse derrière lui. En cours de route, les dialogues peuvent être désinvoltes, parfois acharnés, mais sans temps morts. Évidemment, ceux et celles qui cherchent des assises plus sûres n’y verront peut-être que du feu, mais ce qui compte ici c’est le tout et comment on trouve son plaisir à écouter les détails, ces petits moments qui titillent l’oreille. Difficile alors d’identifier des faits saillants dans tel ou tel morceau; ce qui importe, c’est l’ensemble de l’enregistrement qui, notons-le, se termine dans la bonne humeur avec un rire complice des deux musiciens.

… désinvoltes, parfois acharnés, mais sans temps morts.

Review

Phil Ehrensaft, The WholeNote, no. 10:5, February 1, 2005

French bassist Joëlle Léandre is a very important performer of contemporary music, both composed and improvised, on both sides of the Atlantic. She has performed with the likes of Anthony Braxton, Marilyn Crispell, Georges Lewis, Evan Parker, Steve Lacy, and John Zorn, is a member of Pierre Boulez’s Ensemble intercontemporain, and an accomplished composer in her own right. Like Léandre, the Italian pianist Gianni Lenoci is at home both in jazz and composed music. His mentors in jazz were Mal Waldron and Paul Bley, and he shares Léandre’s passion for the music of John Cage and Morton Feldman.

Lenoci teaches at Italy’s Nino Rota Conservatory. He invited Léandre to give a clinic there, and also proposed a free improvisation recording session, and approached the Belgian radio presenter John Rottiers to handle the production end.

Sur une balançoire translates as "on a teeter-totter," and it’s an apt term for the interaction between these two master musicians. There are fourteen beautifully crafted improvisations ranging from one-and-a-half to just under five minutes in length. The pace varies from intense to stately. Each performer employs the entire stretched range of contemporary techniques that are available for their instruments. They are so well attuned to each other that it’s hard to believe that they are not long-term collaborators.

As of late, Montréal’s Ambiances Magnétiques label has been quite successful in the export market. Albums like Balançoire are the reason.

As of late, Montréal’s Ambiances Magnétiques label has been quite successful in the export market. Albums like Balançoire are the reason.

Review

Marc Chénard, Coda Magazine, no. 307, January 1, 2005

This latest in a steady stream of discs pumped out by the ubiquitous Joëlle Léandre pairs her with a like-minded improviser, the southern Italian pianist and educator Gianni Lenoci. Its title, meaning "On a Seesaw," is an appropriate one, too, for we can almost "see" the pianist at his ivories, pinching strings and what not, and Madame la Contrebasse herself "sawing" away in all but one of the fourteen tracks, each called Sur une balançoire No. 1-14. A compact recording in the best sense of the term, its total length of 45 minutes is a relief to the loads of overextended CDs cut nowadays. The predominant use of the bow by Léandre certainly draws the music away from the jazz orbit, and gives it more of a contemporary music feel; in so doing, there is nothing of the traditional division of labor between lead voice and accompanist, but a “balanced” rapport between them, and hence the title, most probably. This release makes for interesting comparative listening with a previous Leandre CD, Signature on the Red Toucan label, with two Japanese pianists. That said, I am sure that by the time this review appears, there will be more CDs popping out of the woodwork in this bassist’s record-of-the-month club. So please stay tuned… at least if you can keep up with her.

… there is nothing of the traditional division of labor between lead voice and accompanist, but a “balanced” rapport between them, and hence the title, most probably.

Critique

Luc Bouquet, ImproJazz, no. 111, January 1, 2005

Les contrebassistes sont des êtres étonnants. Nous les entendons parcourir le monde, avides de rencontres et d’échanges. Souvenez-vous: Peter, Joëlle, William, Barre… toujours là, généreux, rassembleurs (je n’ose écrire maternels). Joëlle Léandre justement. La voici italienne pour quelques jours à l’occasion d’une classe de maître au Conservatoire de Monopoli (province de Bari). Le pianiste Gianni Lenoci y enseigne le jazz et la musique contemporaine. Les deux n’avaient d’autre choix que celui de se rencontrer. On sait que la première rencontre est le plus souvent riche en intensité (la seconde est parfois plus problématique). Ici, Joëlle et Gianni jouent ce qu’ils sont en cet instant précis; libres, généreux, étonnés par leur propre embrasement. Ces deux-là s’amusent, s’offrent, s’abandonnent, nous les voyons explorer chambres et passages secrets. Laissons leur musique nous envahir et remercions-les pour cette magnifique offrande.


Le premier mot qui vient à l’esprit en écoutant ce disque est «profondeur». Profondeur évidente de la relation qui unit les deux musiciens. Profondeur de champ ou recul nécessaire pour que l’improvisation ne tombe pas de trop haut malgré l’altitude imposée dès le départ. Profondeur encore des harmonies tracées par le pianiste autour du centre de gravité de la bassiste… Profondeur, mais pas distance! Car, pour immense que soit la galaxie explorée ici, à aucun moment l’auditeur ne se sent abandonné au vide ni dépassé par son propre vertige. Chez Joëlle Léandre, une fois de plus, c’est donc la solidité qui fascine. Cette femme travaille le bois de sa contrebasse avec des mains d’ébéniste, construisant une sorte de bâtiment orchestral où l’on sent qu’il fera bon vivre quand ce sera terminé… Alors, on va voir le chantier!

Et l’on croise Gianni Lenoci, pianiste de Monopoli, dans la banlieue de Bari, qui a étudié avec Mal Waldrom, Paul Bley et enregistré avec le quartet d’Eugenio Colombo (Tales of love & death). Le corps visiblement investi jusqu’au fond de l’instrument, il pétrit la pâte sonore avec une gourmandise et une énergie qui font plaisir à deviner. Entre envolées romantiques, passion lyrique, citations contemporaines, (Cage et Feldman sont deux références incontournables des deux artistes) et clins d’œil complices à Erik Satie, il allie la puissance du toucher et la finesse mélodique à une invention harmonique constamment en éveil.

Dans les quatorze improvisations libres de ce disque, Léandre et Lenoci prennent les risques les moins calculés afin que demeure la plus spontanée des musiques, celle que nous aimons et que l’on nommera, selon, free jazz ou musique improvisée, mais qui, de toute façon, restera éminemment contemporaine. Cette musique, donc, qui une fois passée, continue d’exister car elle représente l’instant, l’éphémère et, en conséquence, l’éternité. Une forme de poésie, encore, qui du plus lointain de sa «profondeur» continuera longtemps de se balancer dans notre mémoire immédiate.

L’art de ces deux trapézistes, volant ensemble là-haut avec une telle assurance, me fait songer finalement à cette fameuse définition que l’on donna un jour de la confiance: la confiance, c’est le risque moins la peur.

Cette musique, donc, qui une fois passée, continue d’exister car elle représente l’instant, l’éphémère et, en conséquence, l’éternité.

Compact!

François Nadon, Ici Montréal, December 2, 2004

Joëlle Léandre nous offre l’une de ses plus mémorables performances. Bien heureux pour nous qu’elle ait accepté l’invitation du pianiste Gianni Lenoci car ce que l’on entend sur l’album, ce n’est pas un duo mais une fusion. À l’écoute de ces 4 improvisations, un monde de sensibilité et même de sensualité se dévoile à nos oreilles. Les deux musiciens redéfinissent ce qu’est la beauté en musique improvisée.

Les deux musiciens redéfinissent ce qu’est la beauté en musique improvisée.

Critique

Alex Dutilh, Jazzman, no. 108, December 1, 2004

Entre le pianiste italien et la contrebassiste française, quatorze instants d’instabilité, autant de propositions improvisées, de saynètes musicales. Pas une redite. La fragilité d’un échange sans interdit, avec l’intensité de deux parcours savants. Les pièges de l’informel sont transcendés par un savoir immense sur l’instrument, l’art d’en dilater les frontières physiques, de se jouer des limites techniques. Est-ce la nature plus stable du piano? Joëlle Léandre a trouvé en Gianni Lenoci (première rencontre) un point d’appui à partir duquel aller et venir. Moins un point d’ancrage qu’une balise de repérage. La contrebasse percute, rade, gronde, sifflote, allonge le pas; le piano zigzague, frémit, bruisse, esquisse une citation… Leur duo est un badinage galant où s’échangent des bribes de propositions, autant qu’une dissertation à quatre mains où chacun dissèque le ventre de son instrument. Un in and out mouvant, piquant, abrupt et très doux à la fois. On aurait pu glisser vers la futilité de l’informel si le choix de la brièveté des pièces (de 1’34 à 4’51 minutes) ne créait une exigence réintroduisant un formalisme, celui de la fulgurance. 4/5

La fragilité d’un échange sans interdit, avec l’intensité de deux parcours savants.

Critique

Franck Médioni, Octopus, December 1, 2004

On ne compte plus le nombre d’enregistrements de Joëlle Léandre (musicienne-aventurière insatiable et non moins prolixe à la discographie pléthorique) ni le nombre de duos qu’elle a partagée (Derek Bailey, Carlos Zingaro, Irène Schweizer, Kazue Sawaï, George Lewis, Steve Lacy…). Le duo, c’est l’une sinon sa formule orchestrale préférée, c’est son groupement, son regroupement. («C’est, je pense, l’alternative la plus intense, la plus vraie, la plus complexe, c’est comme un couple d’ailleurs», expliqua-t-elle à Jazz Magazine. «Nous sommes dans l’intime, à ‘fleur de peau’, à ‘fleur de sons’. On ne peut pas tricher. Je crois à cette intimité dans l’improvisation, à cette urgence de dire, un vrai dialogue. Le duo est l’ensemble parfait. Notre partition musicale, c’est l’autre en face de nous et sa vie, ses goûts, ses craintes, ses joies.»). Ce duo inédit qui réunit la contrebassiste Joëlle Léandre et le pianiste Gianni Lenoci est là encore une rencontre rare. Il y est question d’échange, de réceptivité, d’alliages sonores inouïes, de résonances, de matières qui s’ordonnent. Il y a, c’est là toute la force et la fragilité de la musique improvisée, des plongées, des trouées, des abîmes, des transcendances, des fulgurances, toujours sur le fil du rasoir, de façon funambulesque. Sur une balançoire dit le titre du disque. L’image de la balançoire dit bien le balancement, le mouvement organique de la musique que ce duo de funambules tisse.

L’image de la balançoire dit bien le balancement, le mouvement organique de la musique que ce duo de funambules tisse.

Recensione

Francesco Martinelli, Musica Jazz, November 1, 2004

Critique

Eric Normand, JazzoSphère, no. 23, October 1, 2004

Parmi la foisonnante rentrée d’Ambiances Magnétiques, je retiens deux disques particulièrement pertinents au catalogue de l’étiquette qui a définitivement le vent dans les voiles.

Heureuse rencontre entre le pianiste Gianni Lenoci et la contrebassiste Joëlle Léandre, Sur une balançoire est formé de quatorze improvisations savoureuses. Loin des ambiances percussives souvent privilégiées par la contrebassiste, la musique est ténue et dénote une grande finesse d’exécution. Ces quatorze pièces courtes et diversifiées sont une série de petits bibelots sonores où perlent les notes du piano entre les glissandi, la langueur et les coups de la contrebasse. Une musique belle et méditative qui sait réconcilier la musique classique, jazz et l’improvisation libre, subitement et subtilement, en échappant à toutes les étiquettes et en se servant au maximum du potentiel des instruments. Lenoci est pour moi une découverte, un pianiste à part et Joëlle Léandre nous offre ici un aspect délicat de son imposante présence sonore. Sur une balançoire est une suite rêvée qui ne touche pas le sol et qui va librement dans l’air. Un coup de cœur.

Sur une balançoire est une suite rêvée qui ne touche pas le sol et qui va librement dans l’air. Un coup de cœur.

Review

BLG, Downtown Music Gallery, September 24, 2004

It seems that French contrabassists supreme, Joëlle Léandre, loves the duo situation and consistently finds players worldwide worthy of her collaborations. Up at the Guelph Jazz Fest a couple of weeks ago, she played a marvelous duo set with violinist India Cooke. Joëlle seeks out great partners, both well-known and little known. Check out this short list: Rüdiger Carl, Irène Schweizer, Mark Nauseef, Carlos Zingaro, Giorgio Occhipinti, Tetsu Saitoh and François Houle. Can’t say that I’ve heard of Gianni Lenoci before, but he does have three trio CDs out on Splasch and is a member of the Eugenio Colombo Quartet. Besides modern jazz, Gianni performs the music of modern composers like Morton Feldman and John Cage. The title of this CD means “certain to swing” [sic], but I believe they this is meant in jest. This CD consists of 14 shorter pieces. Each piece shows the different styles, approaches and sonic palette that both of these players draw from. Plucking, bowing, rubbing and banging on her bass strings as Gianni also plays inside the piano with assorted objects as well as a variety of cautious, quietly intense and occasionally dreamy sounds on the piano keyboard. Although this is the first time that Joëlle and Gianni had worked together, it is certainly hard to tell, since they work so well together. Another wonderful collaboration from the consistently great Joëlle Léandre.

Another wonderful collaboration from the consistently great Joëlle Léandre.

Critique

Thierry Bissonnette, Voir, September 23, 2004

Contrebassiste d’exception, Joëlle Léandre opte pour une approche excessivement corporelle, grâce à laquelle on croirait parfois s’intégrer aux nerfs et aux os de l’instrumentiste. Dans une démarche rigoureuse et surprenante où elle sollicite aussi la double basse et le bruitisme vocal, les cordes subissent le pincement, le frottement et la percussion sans aucune trace d’exercice de style. Ici rejointe par le pianiste italien Gianni Lenoci, la Française (Aix) s’engage dans un de ces dialogues qui ont fait le bien-fondé de sa quarantaine de disques (aux côtés des Zorn, Frith, Braxton, Lacy, entre autres). Un moment fort pour cette artiste intégrale.

Un moment fort pour cette artiste intégrale.

Compact!

François Dadon, Ici Montréal, September 9, 2004

Cet album est le fruit d’une invitation du pianiste Gianni Lenoci lancée à la grande contrebassiste Joëlle Léandre. Une première rencontre entre les deux musiciens qui laisse l’auditeur pantois devant une telle osmose. À l’écoute, on croirait qu’une seule personne joue simultanément de deux instruments. Léandre et Lenoci ont su faire fi de leur virtuosité respective afin de mettre l’accent sur la qualité de l’ensemble. Leur jeu respectif est musical et plein de retenue. Ils évitent par le fait même les écueils de l’aridité et de la facilité. Le résultat est probant, nos oreilles se laissent bercer au gré des 14 improvisations en duo. Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté. 9,5

Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté.

Compact!

François Dadon, Ici Montréal, September 9, 2004

Cet album est le fruit d’une invitation du pianiste Gianni Lenoci lancée à la grande contrebassiste Joëlle Léandre. Une première rencontre entre les deux musiciens qui laisse l’auditeur pantois devant une telle osmose. À l’écoute, on croirait qu’une seule personne joue simultanément de deux instruments. Léandre et Lenoci ont su faire fi de leur virtuosité respective afin de mettre l’accent sur la qualité de l’ensemble. Leur jeu respectif est musical et plein de retenue. Ils évitent par le fait même les écueils de l’aridité et de la facilité. Le résultat est probant, nos oreilles se laissent bercer au gré des 14 improvisations en duo. Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté. 9,5

Les amateurs de musiques improvisées seront étourdies par tant de beauté.

Review

Dolf Mulder, Vital, no. 435, August 18, 2004

Joëlle Léandre is a very well known improvisor from France, a momument of european improvised music. Her discography is enormous, her collaborations are numerous. She needs no further introduction. Gianni Lenoci on the other hand is a rising star from Italy. He teaches Jazz and Contemporary Music at the Nino Rota Conservatory in Monopoli. He is known for his work as a member the Eugenio Colombo Quartet, a famous quartet in Italy. With computer music composer Franco Degrassi he made an album for the british ASC Records. As a performer of contemporary music he feels affinity with the music of Morton Feldman, John Cage, a.o. This he has in common with Joëlle Léandre who considers John Cage to be one of her most important teachers. How did the meeting between the two come by? Lenoci invited Léandre for a clinic at his conservatory, but also for a recording session because Lenoci had the feeling that “this was the right moment to organize a recording session with Joëlle Léandre.” Alas liner notes do not explain what established this “right moment”. Anyway, to be more exact, on may 31, 2003 they spend a day in a studio in Bari, and recorded 14 improvisations that are all named Balançoire (1 up to 14). Listening to the music the expression ‘civilised improvisation’ came to my mind. The playing is a little clean and controlled, no wild outbrakes or cry from the heart. Léandre and Lenoci stay very kind to each other. But the music is intense and spontaneous on the other hand. Without question we hear two very capable improvisors with great vocabulary and a successfull first meeting. The last track, Balançoire 14, is the most funny track, were Lenoci touches on all kinds of idioms, and you can feel the joy they must have had. Maybe a good starting point for a next meeting.

… you can feel the joy they must have had.

Critique

Les allumés du jazz, no. 11, March 1, 2004

Blog

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.